The Merlion Star JAN. 6, 2017 - Volume 26 - Issue 1

Table Of Contents

  • Navy Leaders Bring Back Rating Titles
  • USS Coronado (LCS 4) continues her mission in Singapore - A Photo Essay
  • Vice Chief of Naval Operations visits Singapore, reaffirms strong partnership
  • 2016 Year in Review

Navy Leaders Bring Back Rating Titles

Rating Modernization's Next Step

From Chief of Naval Operations Public Affairs

Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Admiral John Richardson, with the support of Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV) Ray Mabus and Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy Steve Giordano, made the announcement in NAVADMIN 283/16.

"Our Navy needs to be a fast-learning organization - that includes Navy leadership," Richardson wrote in the NAVADMIN. "The Design for Maintaining Maritime Superiority states that our most junior teammate may have the best idea and that we must be open to capturing that idea. We have learned from you, and so effective immediately, all rating names are restored."

"The SECNAV, MCPON and I, along with other Navy leadership, have had the opportunity to speak with thousands of Sailors during our travels throughout the fleet. The feedback from current and former Sailors has been consistent that there is wide support for the flexibility that the plan offers, but the removal of rating titles was unnecessary and detracted from accomplishing our major goals."

The rating modernization working group will continue its work on the substantive portion of the rating moderation effort.

"As we move forward into the execution stages of the rating modernization, more and more Sailors will have multiple occupational skill sets or ratings. Before we get there, we will need to tackle the issue of managing rating names." - Vice Adm. Robert Burke

"As we looked at rating modernization effort over the past few months, we saw that we could still achieve the positive results we want without changing rating titles right now," said the Navy's Chief of Personnel Vice Adm. Robert Burke. "However, modernizing our industrial-age personnel system in order to provide Sailors choice and flexibility still remains a priority for us. Our personnel system has not fundamentally changed since the 1970s, and just like our ships, aircraft and weapons systems, it needs updates to keep pace with a rapidly changing world. We must not shy away from adapting to meet the needs of a 21st century Navy -- including the way we manage our people."

"As we move forward into the execution stages of the rating modernization, more and more Sailors will have multiple occupational skill sets or ratings," Burke continued. "Before we get there, we will need to tackle the issue of managing rating names. We will involve Sailors throughout the Fleet and leverage the Rating Modernization working group to figure out how to best do that."

"Our personnel system has not fundamentally changed since the 1970s, and just like our ships, aircraft and weapons systems, it needs updates to keep pace with a rapidly changing world. We must not shy away from adapting to meet the needs of a 21st century Navy -- including the way we manage our people." - Vice Adm. Robert Burke

Sailor 2025 is a set of initiatives collectively aimed at modernizing the personnel system, improving the training process and improving career readiness of the Navy's Sailors. The program has been a major focus of effort for SECNAV and CNO as they seek to better prepare the workforce for the current and future operating environment.

USS Coronado (LCS 4) continues her mission in Singapore

Photo essay by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Amy Ressler

Sailors attached USS CORONADO (LCS 4) have been busy over the holiday season serving the greater Singapore community. We wanted to take this opportunity to showcase CORONADO and her crew of amazing Sailors.

Click on the photos for a larger look.

Vice Chief of Naval Operations visits Singapore, reaffirms strong partnership

By CTF 73 Public Affairs

The Vice Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. Bill Moran, visited Singapore Dec 12-13 to reaffirm the U.S. Navy’s strong partnership and ties with the Republic of Singapore Armed Forces.

During the two-day visit, Moran met with the Chief of the Republic of Singapore Navy, Rear Admiral Lai Chung Han, visited support facilities at Changi Naval Base and Sembawang shipyard, and spent time with Sailors assigned to the Littoral Combat Ship USS Coronado (LCS 4).

“Our strategic partnership with the Republic of Singapore Armed Forces reflects our shared commitment to the peace and security of the Indo-Asia-Pacific,” said Moran. “We’re grateful for the cooperation and friendship with partners like Singapore that help our Navy remain forward deployed and ready to contribute to stability within the region.”

In meetings with senior leaders, Moran emphasized the importance of the strategic partnership between the U.S and Singapore and thanked the nation’s senior leaders for supporting the rotational deployments of U.S. Littoral Combat Ships and P8 Poseidon patrol craft to Singapore.

"We’re grateful for the cooperation and friendship with partners like Singapore that help our Navy remain forward deployed and ready to contribute to stability within the region.” - Adm. Bill Moran

Moran also said he was excited about the future of the U.S. and Singapore defense partnership that dates back more than 50 years.

“Our ties with Singapore were founded on a shared belief of a principled, rules-based order that allows all nations to rise peacefully and contribute to the security of the region,” said Moran. “We’re confident that this partnership will continue to flourish in ways that benefit both nations.”

Moran capped of his visit with a tour aboard USS Coronado, currently deployed to Southeast Asia to engage with partner navies across the region.

“You are operating at the crossroads of the global economy,” said Moran during his address to the crew. “Make no mistake, you are playing a vital role and your hard work has an impact on peace and security of the region.”

"Our ties with Singapore were founded on a shared belief of a principled, rules-based order that allows all nations to rise peacefully and contribute to the security of the region. We’re confident that this partnership will continue to flourish in ways that benefit both nations.” - Adm. Bill Moran

While no U.S. base exists in Singapore, the U.S. Navy presence in the island nation dates back several decades and the Navy leases facilities from the Singaporean government.

COMLOG WESTPAC/Task Force 73 was established at the Port of Singapore Authority (PSA), Sembawang Terminal, in July 1992, after the command's relocation from Naval Station Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines. The command provides expeditionary logistics and shore support services for the U.S. 7th Fleet and forward deployed ships.

Additionally, Task Force 73 is the U.S. 7th Fleet's Theater Security Cooperation agent for South and Southeast Asia, promoting military-to-military relations and coordinating exercises such as Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT), Southeast Asia Cooperation and Training (SEACAT) and Pacific Partnership.

2016 Year in Review

2016 has been an exciting year for our entire community. From the year-long Admiral's Cup tournament to multiple change of commands, military members, DoD civilians and their families have had plenty to see and do. Check out our photo grids below to see a year in the life of our Navy Region Singapore community.

January, February, March

April, May, June

July, August, September

October, November, December

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