Hockney: A retrospective of reflection By Melanie Crowley

David Hockney (born 9 July 1937) is an English painter, draughtsman, print maker, stage designer and photographer.
David Hockney. Gregory In The Pool. 1978. Coloured and pressed paper pulp.

I have chosen “Gregory in the Pool” 1978, to be included in the exhibition because it is one of Hockney’s mid artworks which mainly focuses on the human figure form in the water. In this artwork you are able to see a male figure like human resting on the side of the pool as his body is submerged. Hockney used coloured and pressed paper pulp to make this incredible artwork which has a simplified and relaxed feel to it. The colours are dull and soft, which is leaving the viewer feeling tranquil and peaceful. The main focus from a viewer’s perspective is drawn to the man and then is drawn to the ladder in stark contrast to the person as it seems more hard edge and a strong visual element. “Gregory in the Pool” 1978, is a unique piece of this exhibition as it provides a great use of materials and techniques to show Hockney’s interesting fascination with swimming pools.

David Hockney. Board with Still water on blue. 1978. Coloured and pressed paper pulp.

I have chosen "Board with Still water on blue" 1978, to be included in the exhibition because it is one of Hockney's mid artworks which show a diving board above the water. In the artwork you are able to see a diving board placed above a pool set in a courtyard. Below the diving board is the shadow of the diving board submerging in the pool. Hockney used coloured and pressed paper pulp to make this artwork which has a peaceful and cool feel to it. The colours are quite bright and cool and this also leaves the viewer feeling calmed and passive. The main focus which appeals the viewer’s eye is the dull yellow diving board and the bright blue water beneath it. The brilliant colour scheme brings the artwork alive. “Board with Still water on blue”, 1978 is a vigorous piece of this exhibition as it provides a great use of materials and techniques to show Hockney’s interest with swimming pools.

David Hockney. A Bigger Splash. 1967. Acrylic on canvas.

I have chosen “A Bigger Splash” 1967, to be included in the exhibition because it is one of Hockney’s earlier artworks which show a splash centred in the middle of the artwork. In this artwork you are able to see a large splash and its incredible splash marks, a dull yellow diving board and also the appearance of an apartment building with palm trees surfacing behind the apartment building. Hockney used acrylic paint and a canvas to make this artwork which has a hard edge and unusual feel to it. The colours Hockney used in the artwork are quite warm and eye catching as they all balance together. The main focus which draws a viewer’s eye is the contrast to the realist big splash and the apartment behind the main focus. “A Bigger Splash” 1967, is a vigorous piece of this exhibition as it provides a great use of materials and techniques to show Hockney’s interest with swimming pools.

David Hockney. Sun On The Pool. 13th April 1982. Composite Polaroid.

I have chosen “Sun on the Pool” 1982, to be included in the exhibition because it is one of Hockney’s later artworks which mainly focuses on the concept on a bird’s eye view of a swimming pool. In this artwork you are able to see the composite photograph of a pool which features sun chairs in the background as well as the garden edge and to the side of the pool a diving platform. Hockney used composite Polaroid to capture this exhilarating artwork which has a fascinating and visually stimulating feeling to it. The colours are quite naturally bland, but the cool blues from the water and the intriguing pattern on the bottom of the pool really express the main focus to the pool. The composite artwork brings captivating attention to the audience which draws them in. “Sun on the Pool”, 1982 is an unique piece of this exhibition as it provides a great use of materials and techniques to show Hockney’s fascination with swimming pools.

David Hockney. Study Of Water. 1976. Crayon on Paper.

I have chosen “Study of Water” 1976, to be included in the exhibition because it is one of Hockney’s mid artworks which mainly focuses on the elements of water in the swimming pool and the reflects the water has created. In this artwork you are able to see a section of to what appears to be a public swimming pool which the sun lightning had made wiggly patterns of reflection on the surface of the water. Hockney has used coloured crayons on paper to create this breathtaking artwork. The main eye catching focus point about this artwork is the exceptional lightning reflection on the surface of the water, then your eye is drawn to see the cool blue and yellow tones of the tiles. The two colours contrast exceptionally well in this artwork making the viewer feel various calm feelings. “Study of Water” 1976, is a unique piece of this exhibition as it provides a great use of materials and techniques to show Hockney’s fascination with swimming pools

David Hockney. Study Of Water In A Pool. 1966. Pencil and Coloured Pencil.

I have chosen “Study of water in a pool” 1966, to be included in the exhibition because it is one of Hockney’s earlier and simpler artworks which focuses more on the elements and visual techniques of studying water. In this artwork you are able to see the effect sunlight will give when being reflected on water. Behind the water is a pool filter and above that is the side of the pool. Hockney used pencil, coloured pencils and paper to make this artwork which gives a simplified but elegant appearance. The colours are driving but not over the top which really pulls the artwork together. The main focus point drawn to an audience would be the techniques he has used to construct the reflection of sunlight on the water. “Study of water in a pool” 1966, is a unique piece of this exhibition as it provides a great use of multiple elements and techniques to show Hockney’s fascination with swimming pools.

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