Dropping of the Atomic Bomb Again, there is no liberty, if the power of judging be not separated from the legislative and executive powers.

By Katelyn Arp

Montesquieu would have been against the dropping of the atomic bomb during World War Two. He would have been against the dropping of the bomb because the United States had too much power with the atomic bomb. There was an imbalance in power between the United States and Japan and he wanted all powers to be equal. He writes many times that powers should be balanced.

When the legislative and executive powers are united in the same person, or in the same body of magistrates, there can be no liberty; because apprehensions may arise.

Montesquieu argues that all the branches of government should be equal. When the United States dropped the atomic bomb on Japan, the United States had more power than Japan. He would have disagreed with this because it would have been like the legislative branch having more power then the executive branch Montesquieu is saying that everyone should have there own power but it should be equal to everyone else because if the power is not equal problems will happen.

There is no liberty if the power of judging be not separated from the legislative and executive powers.

Montesquieu belived all powers should be equal, this was not equal.

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Created with images by skeeze - "atomic bomb nuclear weapon fat man"

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