The settlement of Aotearoa by sada mahindo

1. KUPE'S JOURNEY TO AOTEAROA

The history of New Zealand dates back at around 700 years or more to when it was discovered and settled by Polynesians, who developed a distinct culture called Māori, centred on kinship links and land. According to Maori legend, Kupe was the first explorer to reach New Zealand (NZ) he ventured across the pacific all the way from his ancestral home land (Hawaiki) using his voyaging canoe called a waka hourua.

2.THE DISCOVERY OF MAORI PEOPLE

The word "Māori" is referring to the indigenous people of Aotearoa, it forms a unique part of the Aotearoa (New Zealand) culture, both the term and the people are a hybrid of various Polynesian cultures.

3.WHERE DO MAORI PEOPLE LIVE?

Throughout history, the Mäori population has been concentrated in the North Island. In 1996, 86-87.5 percent of the Mäori population lived in the North Island. Over half of this group lived in either Auckland, Waikato or the Bay of Plenty regional council. Around 86% - 87.5% of the Maori live in The North Islands. They also make up around 25% of Auckland’s population.

4. MAORI CULTURE -link: http://www.lovenewzealand.net.nz/maori/

Maraes, (which are communal "plaza" areas where Maori people meet), dispense (provide) a focus for social, cultural and spiritual life within the Maori community. The Marae also includes a meeting house (wharenui) and a dining room (wharekai).

5. WHAT ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT PARTS OF MAORI CULTURE?

Maori people identify themselves by their tribe (iwi). Family is important in Maori culture as well. Dance is another important part of the Maori culture. Kapa haka (Maori performance art/ traditional dance), involes singing, dancing and also facial expressions. Each action from the dance has its own meaning, tying it to the words. The Maori traditional war dance (the haka), is performed by the All Blacks (the National Rugby Team), before every game.

Maori language (kohanga reo) is distinctive, while its knowledge was lost from many Maori people for a while, it's now promoted and encouraged in Aotearoa/NZ. These polynesian people settled Aotearoa and became known as the Maori. They formed their own beautiful culture, language and as well as their traditions. Maori people hunted a variety of birds and fish they found around New Zealand, and favoured the warmer climates of the North Island.

6. THE ARRIVAL OF EURO SETTLERS

Land wars broke out with the arrival of the European settlers. In the year 1840, the entente of Waitangi was written and signed by several of Maori Chiefs and that gave the British monarchy sovereignty over parts of New Zealand. Hesitation has long remained over what the entente actually said and meant, as the Maori version translates differently to the English version. The Maori actually believed they retained the rights to their land.

So there you have it, little information about the Maori people. THANKS FOR READING!

Credits:

Created with images by gemb1 - "Maori Culture" • jumpyjodes - "maori family dancers" • KRiemer - "denmark danish coast island" • JSilver - "Te Marae"

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