Interconnections death by chocolate/cottoning on

From the Syllabus:

GEOGRAPHICAL CONCEPTS

The concept of interconnection emphasises that no object of geographical study can be viewed in isolation.

An understanding of the concept of interconnection may be developed in the following ways:

  • People and organisations in places are interconnected with other places in a variety of ways. These interconnections have significant influences on the characteristics of places and on changes in these characteristics.
  • Environmental and human processes, for example, the water cycle, urbanisation or human-induced environmental change, are sets of cause-and-effect interconnections that can operate between and within places. They can sometimes be organised as systems involving networks of interconnections through flows of matter, energy, information and actions.

CONTENT FOCUS

Students focus on the connections people have to places across a range of scales. They examine what shapes people’s perceptions of places and how this influences their connections to places. Students explore how transport, information and communication technologies and trade link people to many places. They explain the effects of human activities, such as production, recreation and travel, on places and environments in Australia and across the world and investigate sustainability initiatives and possible futures for these places.

Production and consumption

Students:

investigate the effects of the production and consumption of goods on people, places and environments throughout the world, for example:

  • examination of environmental, social and economic impacts of production and consumption of chocolate/fashion
  • assessment of the effect of production and consumption of chocolate in Ghana/Ivory Coast OR fashion in Asia (Bangladesh, China, India)
  • explanation of responses by governments, groups and individuals to minimise the effects of production and consumption of chocolate/fashion

Trade

Students:

investigate the ways places and people are interconnected through trade in goods and services across a range of scales, for example

  • identification of the trade connections associated with the chocolate/fashion industry
  • examination of a country's trade links with other countries eg sources of raw material
  • analysis of spatial patterns of global trade eg production and concumption

DEATH BY CHOCOLATE

Some Key Inquiry Questions

Who eats the most chocolate?
How are places connected through the trade of chocolate?
Which companies make the most chocolate?

WHAT PATTERNS EMERGE WHEN WE INVESTIGATE THE PATTERNS OF CHOCOLATE PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION, AND TRADE IN CHOCOLATE?

IMPACTS OF PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION OF CHOCOLATE

Child labour

For a decade and a half, the big chocolate makers have promised to end child labour in their industry—and have spent tens of millions of dollars in the effort. But as of the latest estimate, 2.1 million West African children still do the dangerous and physically taxing work of harvesting cocoa. What will it take to fix the problem?

The Ivory Coast and Ghana can be used as case studies

Environmental impacts

Assessment tasks - inquiry suggestions

  • Are we really running out of chocolate?
  • Why does child labour/slavery exist in the chocolate industry?
  • What are the environmental impacts of cocoa plantations?
  • Is Fairtrade fair?
  • What are the positive and negative features of Fairtrade?
  • Is one type of fair trade certification better than another?

Create an interconnections map to show the links a chocolate manufacturer (eg Darrell Lea, Haighs, Koko Black, Max Brenner) has with their:

  • source of cocoa
  • export markets
  • tourist sources
  • ethical trade connections

Conduct a survey to determine:

  • The main brands of chocolate consumed by your year group (maps)
  • What students know about fairtade
  • If students choose fairtrade chocolate
  • How awareness of their consumption of chocolate links them with chocolate production/slave labour in Africa

Develop a campaign - social media, school newsletter, blog etc to promote ethical consumption of chococlate

COTTONING ON SOME Key Inquiry Questions

How are we connected through the fashion industry?
What are some of the social and environmental impacts of jean production?
Which nations are we connected to through our clothes?

IMPACTS and EFFECTS/ RESPONSES

How has Greenpeace responded to reduce the impacts of the fashion industry? Investigate the Dirty Laundry campaign.
What is the Better Cotton Initiative?
Watch some of the documentary, "The True Cost".

ASSESSMENT TASKS - INQUIRY SUGGESTIONS

Develop an infographic about fair trade and fashion
  • Research the Fair Wear Foundation
  • Develop a report card for the brands accredited by this scheme to identify its progress as an ethical fashion provider
Class survey
  • Survey the class on where they bought their clothes.
  • How many of these appear in the ethical fashion guide?
  • Tabulate the sources of clothes and their rating in this survey
  • Report on the results
What is the Bangladesh Accord? How are fashion companies in Australia linked to this accord and to Bangladesh?

SOCIAL ENTERPRISE

Can social enterprises such as The Possibility Project help minimise the impacts of the fashion industry?

Use guest speakers from social enterprises such as The Possibility Project to examine:

  • What is social enterprise?
  • What connections does it have with other countries/places/people?
  • How does it work to improve the impacts of our links through the fashion industry?
Created By
Debra Owens
Appreciate

Credits:

Created with images by AlexanderStein - "chocolate dark coffee" • 526663 - "cocoa beans cocoa cacao" • BEP - "fashion model t shirt" • luisacontreras-87 - "Ganaché de chocolate" • Alex-501 - "Jeans Butt"

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