DNA to Disease Huntington's Disease

Huntington's Disease is a disease in which the nerve cells of the brain tend to break down. The mutation occurs in the Huntingtin Gene, which is on chromosome 4, and it creates a Huntington protein.

The symptoms of the disease include personality changes, depression, mood swings, unclear speech, significant weight loss, forgetfulness, and many more.

The disease was first titled in 1872 by George Huntington when there were many people on the same Island as him that had the disease. The Huntington gene was first discovered by a group of investigators in 1993.

There are currently 30,000 people living in the United States and more than 200,000 people worldwide that are diagnosed with Huntington's Disease.

A person that is diagnosed with the disease will usually die after 15-25 years after the disease begins. A person diagnosed with the disease will not usually die straight from the disease but because of the symptoms of the disease, such as choking and heart failure.

Huntington's Disease can only be diagnosed if you have the Huntington Gene. There is no way to control whether or not you get the gene because it is inherited at birth.

Every population and gender has an equal chance of developing the disease. Every child that comes from a parent with Huntington's disease will have a 50/50 chance of developing the disease. If the child comes from parents with no Huntington gene, then he/she will never develop the disease.

Huntington’s Disease is autosomal and it is a dominant disorder. This means that a person only needs one copy of the gene to get the disorder.There currently are no treatments to cure the disease entirely, although there are medications to help slow the symptoms.

There currently are no treatments to cure the disease entirely, although there are medications to help slow the symptoms.

Although there are no treatments to cure the disease, researchers are constantly searching for one. Current research includes evaluating brain restoration, brain metabolism, and using PET tests. PET stands for positron emission tomography, and it is used to look inside the body and show how the organs and tissues are working.

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Works Cited

“About Huntington’s Disease and Related Disorders.” John Hopkins Medicine, 2017, www.hopkinsmedicine.org/. Accessed 3 Feb. 2017.

Adobe Spark. Adobe Systems, 2016, spark.adobe.com/. Accessed 3 Feb. 2017.

“An End to HD?” Huntington’s Disease Society of America, 2017, hdsa.org/. Accessed 4 Feb. 2017.

“Huntington Disease - Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Pathology.” YoutTube, YouTube, 2017, www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuSaXiRVqg0. Accessed 4 Feb. 2017.

Pagano, Gennaro. “Current Status of PET Imaging in Huntington’s Disease.” EBSCOhost, EBSCO, 2017, web.b.ebscohost.com/.

“What Is Huntington Disease?” Huntington Society of Canada, 2016, www.huntingtonsociety.ca/. Accessed 4 Feb. 2017.

“What Is Huntington’s Disease.” Huntington’s Disease Society of America, 2017, hdsa.org. Accessed 3 Feb. 2017.

“Who Is at Risk.” Huntington’s Disease Society of Amrerica, 2017, hdsa.org/. Accessed 4 Feb. 2017.

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