The Globe Theater By: ethan salyer

Shakespeare

Source:

Anderson, Robert. "William Shakespeare's Life: A Genius From Stratford." Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking , by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 776-77.

Quote #1

By 1592, Shakespeare had already become an actor and a playwright. By 1594, he was a charter member of the theatrical company called the Lord Chamberlain's Men, which was later to become the King's Men.

My Ideas:

Shakespeare was already an accomplished person before he came to fame. After he became know he continued to prosper and created many more master pieces.

Source:

Anderson, Robert. "William Shakespeare's Life: A Genius From Stratford." Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking , by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 776-77.

Quote #2

He had a theater that needed plays, actors who needed parts, and a family that needed to be fed.

My Ideas:

Shakespeare was a very busy man. There was always something he needed to do. He needed to write plays, give the actors their parts, and feed his family.

Design

Source:

Seidel, Michael. "Globe Theatre." <i>World Book Student</i>. World Book, 2016. Web. 18 Nov. 2016.

Quote #3

Little is known about the Globe's design. It may have held as many as 3,000 spectators. In 1613, the Globe burned down. It was rebuilt on the same foundation and reopened in 1614. The Globe was torn down in 1644. A reconstruction of the theater was completed in 1996, and it officially opened in 1997.

My Ideas:

Not a lot is known about the theaters design, but it may have held as many as 3,000 spectators. That is a very large amount of people in on building in that day and age.

Location

Source:

Seidel, Michael. "Globe Theatre." <i>World Book Student</i>. World Book, 2016. Web. 18 Nov. 2016.

Quote #4

The Globe Theatre was a theater in London that first presented most of the plays by the great English playwright William Shakespeare. The brothers Cuthbert and Richard Burbage built the theater in 1599. It was built in the area known as the Bank side on the south side of the River Thames in the suburb of Southwark.

My Ideas:

The Globe presented almost all of Shakespeare's amazing plays. It was built in the Bank side on the south side or the River Thames in the suburb of Southwark.

The Life Line

When it was made

Source:

“Shakespeare: The Legacy ,” Films Media Group, 2016, cvod.infobase.com/PortalPlaylists.aspx?wID=103800&amp;xtid=114446.

Quote #5

London playhouse, built in 1598, where most of Shakespeare's plays were first presented. It burned in 1613, was rebuilt in 1614, and was destroyed by the Puritans in 1644. A working replica opened in 1997. (J.C. Adams)

My Ideas:

The globe theater was built in 1598 and Shakespeare performed many of his plays here until there was an accident. The original globe theater was burned down in 1613 and was rebuilt in 1614.

The Destruction

Source

“Shakespeare: The Legacy ,” Films Media Group, 2016, cvod.infobase.com/PortalPlaylists.aspx?wID=103800&amp;xtid=114446.

Quote #6

London playhouse, built in 1598, where most of Shakespeare's plays were first presented. It burned in 1613, was rebuilt in 1614, and was destroyed by the Puritans in 1644. A working replica opened in 1997. (J.C. Adams)

My Ideas:

In 1644 the theater was again destroyed. This time it was no accident, the Puritans pulled it down due to "probable forgery" and to make room for tenements. The globe was not the only theater taken down, all theaters were.

The Wooden O

Source:

---. "Shakespeare and His Theater: A Perfect Match." Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking , by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 778-80.

Quote #7

Shakespeare call his theater a "wooden O." It was a large round (or polygonal) building, three stories high, with a large platform stage that projected from one end into a yard open to the sky. (Anderson 4)

My Ideas:

The Globe theater was a well designed and beautiful building. The way that it was design made everyone feel like they were really apart of the play/ story. The circular shape made sure that everyone heard the actors.

Source:

---. "Shakespeare and His Theater: A Perfect Match." Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking , by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 778-80.

Quote #8

In the back wall of this stage was a curtained-off inner stage, Flanking the inner stage were two doors for entrances and exits. Above this inner stage was a small balcony or upper stage, which could be used to suggest Juliet's balcony or the high walls of a castle or the bridge of a ship. Trap doors were placed in the floor of the main stage for entrances and exits of ghosts and for descents into hell.

My Ideas:

In the description above you and tell that the building of this great theater was thoroughly thought out in order to fit many different scenarios. Even though the plays had not been written they compensated for future ideas that might occur and made certain things due to belief and religion.

What went Down

Great Happenings

Source:

"Globe Theater." <i>Bloom's Literature</i>. Facts On File, Inc. Web. 18 Nov. 2016

Quote #9

As You Like It runs the glorious gamut of pastoral romance: disguises and love notes, poetry and brilliant conversation, gentle satire and full-on slapstick, and passion throughout it all! This staging—performed at Shakespeare’s Globe, London’s faithful reconstruction of the open-air playhouse designed in 1599.

My Ideas:

Some many great things went down in the Globe. For example, romance, disguises, love notes, poetry, brilliant conversations, gentle satire, full on slapstick, and a great amount of passion.

Nothing Without the Globe

Source:

"Globe Theater." <i>Bloom's Literature</i>. Facts On File, Inc. Web. 18 Nov. 2016

Quote #10

As You Like It runs the glorious gamut of pastoral romance: disguises and love notes, poetry and brilliant conversation, gentle satire and full-on slapstick, and passion throughout it all! This staging—performed at Shakespeare’s Globe, London’s faithful reconstruction of the open-air playhouse designed in 1599

My Ideas:

So many different emotions, stories, thoughts, and much more all happened in one place, The Globe Theater. The name is infamous in the performing arts world. Without out the Globe none of Shakespeare's great and amazing plays would have been performed.

Credits:

Created with images by Kieran Lynam - "Shakespeare's Globe" • tonynetone - "William Shakespeare" • mckaysavage - "UK - 30 - Globe Theatre - hallway" • ADTeasdale - "Palace of Westminster" • Peter Glyn - "Globe Theatre" • EllenSeptember - "The rebuilt Globe Theater" • Arbron - "The Globe" • alicia bramlett - "The Globe Theatre" • Rev Stan - "The Globe stage canopy from groundling level" • mckaysavage - "UK - 28 - Globe Theatre" • HerryLawford - "The Thames, the City and the Tate"

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