Reconstruction Barnabas Na

Reconstruction strove to appease the ever changing nature of public opinion. Furthermore, with a public drastically shifted due to new members of society, the government sought to constring new laws to fit everyone's rights. However, such rights were denied by a tired public opinion weary of black rights, southern opposition, the KKK and black codes. SUch hindrance failed to promote immediate social change, but with blacks and minorities fighting for equal rights, they set forth a fight for quality in the future. Reconstruction was widely framed by freed people and radical republicans to imbue new political and economic standards, and with a driving passion why did reconstruction fail to implant immediate action, but provided a platform for social freedom in the future? Although, Reconstruction placed permanent amendments, such laws were not reinforced, and blacks were unable to utilize or experience their basic rights due to opposition from many groups of communities. Therefore, immediate action sought as a failure due to hindrance of opposing groups, but created a nature to afflict the government to grant basic rights.

Failure of reconstruction

The cartoon constructed by Thomas Nast, belabors the negative aspects of the Andrew Johnson administration and the failure of Reconstruction to promote social change.Furthermore, Andrew Johnson received heavy criticism for pardoning many confederate leaders and his subtle attempt to apply punishment, while in duration disregarded the needs of freed slaves. Moreover, the cartoon portrays southern aggression towards blacks, and how such reforms were fraught with radical riots, and opposition to the assumed nature of Reconstruction. Such aggression accompanied with flawed policies of leaders, hindered freed people from attaining their basic rights. Moreover, such mentality was vastly seen in the south, where black southerners were put into submission due to their white counterparts utilizing fear and physical dilemma to hinder their attaining of basic rights. Moreover, with the continuing of oppression and submission towards blacks, blacks utilized such a platform of oppression to argue their unalienable rights.

Success of Reconstruction

The image shown above is the depiction of the fifteenth amendment in which it states “the right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.” Amendments such as the 15th and 14th, were pathways of shaping government and their laws to abide to the changing public interest. In which, former enslaved blacks and supporters sought to establish laws that fulfill common rights and protect their political and economic necessities. Moreover, such an attitude provided a stepping point for blacks to voice their opinion towards a government undeniably must abide to public opinion. Although such jurisdiction were in place, many foundations such as the freedmen's bureau and the Civil Rights Bill of 1867, were vetoed by Andrew Johnson, and provided a impediment towards civil rights. Continuing this prospect, such amendments were blind to southern whites, in which southern whites utilized the KKK, and black codes to incite fear in blacks to give up their freedom to vote and voice their opinion. Overall, immediate emplacement did not occur due to hindrance of white supremacy, but created concrete foundations from reconstruction to today to abide on.

Legacy of Reconstruction

Given its failure and success, there is no doubt Reconstruction left a legacy and foundation future leaders and inspirers could base their influence on. For instance, reconstruction furthered associations such as the American Equal Rights Association, in which they set out a platform for rights for women and blacks, In which they make an argument that “every human soul you meet is the work of women.” With this, the association continues pro equality no matter what gender or race. Moreover, Reconstruction saw the risings of groups that fought for equality, and stood as one to promote their goal to shift government to favor their vast opinion. Overall, although Reconstruction placed many amendments and bills to appease rights, African-Americans largely fought for their rights preceding and during Reconstruction, and advanced civil rights for all minorities.

Synthesis/Conclusion

Similar to today, such radical ideals and movements to attain basic rights are still apparent today. With movements such as black lives matter, and organizations to improve women's equality, the movements are based on ideals placed in Reconstruction. In which a group experiences a taking of a right and chooses to fight against such an injustice. For instance, During Reconstruction, Blacks had apparent rights given to them, but white society justified them as inferior, and excluded blacks into a worse position. Similar to today, African-Americans have apparent rights, but with white supremacy emerging once again and police brutality at an indignified stance, African-Americans experience a seclusion of their rights due to their race. In which they are regarded variedly and differently in the public eye, and are substantially at higher risks of incarceration. Such periods of racial demeanor show the two periods fight to attain equal liberties. Overall, Reconstruction provided the framework future foundations utilized to justify their cause. Such as civil rights, women's activism, and rights for minorities, Reconstruction saw an increase of minorities voicing their opinion to escape a hole of seclusion, poverty, and unequal rights and opportunities.

MLA Citation

"Address on the First Anniversary of the American Equal Rights Association." Smithsonian Primary Sources in U.S. History, Gale, 2016. Smithsonian Primary Sources in U.S. History, Accessed 17 Jan. 2017.

"Andrew Johnson's Reconstruction and How It Works." Smithsonian Primary Sources in U.S. History, Gale, 2016. Smithsonian Primary Sources in U.S. History, Accessed 16 Jan. 2017.

"Fifteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution." Smithsonian Primary Sources in U.S. History, Gale, 2016. Smithsonian Primary Sources in U.S. History, Accessed 17 Jan. 2017.

Credits:

"Wade-Davis Bill (excerpt)." Smithsonian Primary Sources in U.S. History, Gale, 2016. Smithsonian Primary Sources in U.S. History, Accessed 17 Jan. 2017. "Andrew Johnson's Reconstruction and How It Works." Smithsonian Primary Sources in U.S. History, Gale, 2016. Smithsonian Primary Sources in U.S. History, Accessed 16 Jan. 2017. "Fifteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution." Smithsonian Primary Sources in U.S. History, Gale, 2016. Smithsonian Primary Sources in U.S. History, Accessed 17 Jan. 2017. "Address on the First Anniversary of the American Equal Rights Association." Smithsonian Primary Sources in U.S. History, Gale, 2016. Smithsonian Primary Sources in U.S. History, Accessed 17 Jan. 2017.

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