History of the periodic table BY jack villa- fordon

Doberiner

Johann Wolfgang Döbereiner was a German chemist who is best known for work that foreshadowed the periodic law for the chemical elements. He become a professor of chemistry and pharmacy at the university of Jena

Johann Döbereiner put forward his law of triads in 1817. Each of Döbereiner's triads was a group of three elements. The appearance and reactions of the elements in a triad were similar to each other.

He made triads

Newlands

An English scientist called John Newlands put forward his law of octaves in 1864. He arranged all the elements known at the time into a table in order of relative atomic mass. When he did this, he found that each element was similar to the element eight places further on. For example, starting at Li, Be is the second element, B is the third and Na is the eighth element.

He made the periodic table more complicated than it already needed to be.

Mendeleev

In 1869, just five years after John Newlands put forward his law of octaves, a Russian chemist called Dmitri Mendeleev published a periodic table. Mendeleev also arranged the elements known at the time in order of relative atomic mass, but he did some other things that made his table much more successful.

He realised that the physical and chemical properties of elements were related to their atomic mass in a 'periodic' way, and arranged them so that groups of elements with similar properties fell into vertical columns in his table.

This man invented gaps

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Created with images by brianc - "Periodic Table"

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