Feminist Movements Giovanna Giusto & Aldo Saenz

A woman's role was seen to be child-rearing and taking care of the home, but as a result of the industrial revolution many women were in full-time employment, which meant they had opportunities to meet in large organised groups to discuss political and social issues, but still they will not have the right to be part of political issues.
Nineteenth century feminists talked about "The Cause". This was a movement for women's rights. It had no particular political focus. But by the close of the century the issue of the vote became the focus of women's struggle for equality.
The movement to gain votes for women had two wings, the suffragists and the suffragettes. The suffragists had their origins in the mid nineteenth century, while the suffragettes came into being in 1903.

Susan B. Anthony

Susan B. Anthony was a suffragist, abolitionist, author and speaker who was the president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association.After the Civil War, Anthony began focus more on women's rights. She helped establish the American Equal Rights Association in 1866 with Stanton, calling for the same rights to be granted to all regardless of race or sex. Anthony and Stanton created and produced The Revolution, a weekly publication that lobbied for women's rights in 1868. The newspaper's motto was "Men their rights, and nothing more; women their rights, and nothing less."
Suffragists wanted the vote for middle class property-owning women. They believed they would achieve their end using peaceful tactics - non-violent demonstrations, petitions and the lobbying of MPs. Fawcett believed that if the organisation was seen to be intelligent, polite and law-abiding then women would prove themselves responsible enough to participate fully in politics.

Emmeline Pankhusrt

Emmeline Pankhurst was born in England in 1858. In 1903, she founded the Women's Social and Political Union, which used militant tactics to agitate for women's suffrage. Pankhurst was imprisoned many times, but supported the war effort after World War I broke out. Parliament granted British women limited suffrage in 1918. Pankhurst died in 1928, shortly before women were given full voting rights.
The suffragettes, a name given to them by the newspaper The Daily Mail, were born out of the suffragist movement. And was created by Emmeline Pankhurst.
Mrs Pankhurst believed it would take an active organisation, with young working class women, to draw attention to the cause. The motto of the suffragettes was deeds not words and from 1912 onwards they became more militant and violent in their methods of campaign. Law-breaking, violence and hunger strikes all became part of this society's campaign tactics.

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