Changing perspectives on Geishas Kayla messerschmiDt, laurel lokhaiser, caperton sterner, laksha udayalal, natalie mundis

Imagine a life where you are constantly being criticized for who you are naturally; even though you are just trying your best to make everyone happy. A geisha has multiple people to entertain continually, all day and night. In Arthur Golden’s Memoirs of a Geisha, he shows the struggles of geisha throughout their draining lives. Geisha go through years of training all their life, but the most grueling is when a geisha turns from a Minarai to a Maiko. The transition from the younger apprentice stages to a full fledged geisha may take up to five years. Geisha must also learn the specific traditions of art and music, including learning how to play various instruments, as well as the art of calligraphy. As a geisha goes through her rankings, she wears different types of clothes. Some may include really high platform flip flops and kimono’s with sleeves down to the floor. Also they take a lot of pride in their makeup. Geisha want to look like a porcelain doll, so they use wax to fill their face. Every morning, geisha take at least an hour on her makeup. The purpose of this literary Magazine is to inform and explain how geisha are perceived rather than how people see them and their traditions. In this magazine there are several artistic products that help support the purpose. There are two documentaries; one that explains the education geisha must go through, and one that elaborates on the difference between a call girl and a geisha. In this magazine, there is also a drawing that represents the many talents of a geisha. Furthermore, the music that geisha perform is shown through a song that is traditional to geisha. In conclusion, the many artistic products in this magazine help support the main purpose.

Documentary by Kayla Messerschmidt

Painting by Laksha Udayalal

Documentary by Laurel Lokhaiser

Poems by Caperton Sterner

Women run the okiya, women teach girls the skills they need to become geisha, and women introduce new geisha into the teahouses that will be their livelihood.

Women run the teahouses and can make or break a geisha's career. If a geisha offends the mistress of the main teahouse where she does business, she may lose her livelihood entirely.

A geisha is always a single woman. If she decides to get married, she retires from the profession.

Many gestures performed by Geishas have a hidden meaning.

It can take up to two hours (or even more) for a Geisha to get all ready.

The geisha world is also referred to as the flower-and-willow world.

Geisha are highly trained professionals—experts in traditional Japanese dance, music, tea ceremony, games and poetry, etiquette, deportment, and repartee.

Who Am I?

Lives in the Flower and WIllow World

Where you will only find me Single

A Married me does not exist

Sometimes but not always marry my clients

But if that happens I must retire from the profession.

Living under a contract

In your own home

Which is run by a proprietress who is called Mother

Usually a Retired one herself

Where preparing for their job takes at least an hour to get ready

Having more makeup on then a covergirl

Hairstyles like they are a celebrity walking the red carpet

And dressed in one of Japan’s most beautiful treasures, the kimono.

Starts out as a maid

Takes years and years to learn the trade

Entertainers but not prostitutes

Entertaining them with song, dance, games and conversation.

And we are paid according to time consumption.

Preparing for the event takes one hour plus to get ready

And girls having more makeup on then a cover girl.

Hair Styles like they are a celebrity walking the red carpet

Dressed in one of Japan’s most beautiful treasures, the Kimono.

Appearance changes throughout our career

From the girlish, heavily made-up entertainer, to an older established one.

Different hairstyles and hair pins signify different stages of a girl's development

When everything is done and over with

Preparing for the event costs about 50,000 yen.

Highly Trained professionals

Experts in traditional Japanese dance, music, and tea ceremonies

Most Gestures made by me have a hidden meaning

I am a Japanese Celebrity

⅓ of us has a mother in the same profession

We have been known to be the Fashion leaders

Many of us attend the Hanayagi school to master the art of Buto

In earlier days we would begin training as early as age 4

But now we begin during the teenage years.

Our clothes weigh about 22 pounds.

All must learn shamisen-playing, though it takes years to master.

Some of us don’t only dance and play music, but would write poems.

While Others paint pictures or compose music.

Poems and Japanese style music by Natalie Mundis

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