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My thoughts on using the Fujifilm x100f

As a professional photographer I have used many different kinds of camera during my thirty-year career; from 35mm to medium format to large format. I have used film and digital of course too.

In a professional sense the camera is just a tool. It needs to function as expected and flawlessly.

By its nature no camera will satisfy every situation that a photographer requires. Some cameras are great for tethering to a computer whilst others are great out in the field.

Professionally, I use two systems: Sony and Nikon. Both have their strengths for the varied photographic commissions I undertake. I'd like to use just the one system of course but it's not currently possible for me.

PProcessed in C1 & LR

So where does the Fujifilm x100f fit in (that's the third system I own, actually!)? Well, my photography spills into a pastime too but I don't want to be carrying around heavy gear any more than I have to so a lightweight system was needed.

The x100 series have many things in their favour. I don't want to make this into a camera review but I will just brush on the things that appeal to me about this little gem.

The size is a big must as I've said. The fact it has a fixed lens is also great as it's always ready to go (no sensor cleaning or lens selection needed). Having said that though, there are two conversion lenses that are sold for this cameras to make the lens into either a 50mm or 28mm from the fixed 35mm equivalent lens. The 50mm conversion lens is something I use most of the time as I just love that focal length.

The camera might be small but it's fairly tough. It's not water / dust resistant tough but I tend not to venture out in bad conditions even with my pro cameras so that's not a problem.

The lens and quality of the files is a very big need for me. I'm used to using high-resolution full-frame cameras and I'm afraid I compare any pocket cameras to them. It's not a fair comparison of course but I don't care lol. So for me to say the file quality is excellent is a big thing.

Now I would still regard my 35 and 42Mb cameras with their Zeiss, Sigma and Nikon lenses to be the ones I'd use for those fine detail landscapes, where distant trees need to be crisp. The x100f though does a grand job though.

So what else do I like about the little Fuji?

Well, it's the fact that this camera reminds me of previous film cameras I've owned. My Nikon fm2 in particular had a certain simplicity about it with its two basic controls (aperture and shutter speed). I used the Nikon long before I went to college or turned professional. It made me look at the world around me and interpret it through the camera's lens.

The Fuji has allowed me to relive those simple times where the camera's simplicity and size didn't get in the way of my viewing the world.

Of course, a modern digital camera has a great many extra functions than it's analogue predecessor, but, with the x100f you can set and forget a great many of those functions and use the camera in a much more simplistic way

Even though I just needed a camera to carry around with me when I'm off duty I was never satisfied with a regular point & shoot. I did want something I could interact with to suit my needs and I did want the quality from a good file. I find this all in the Fuji x100f (and, indeed its predecessors, from the first x100 through to the 2nd and 3rd variants).

In fact, and surprisingly, I've used the 'f' for some professional commission too. It's that good. I've shot some documentary-style commissions for some articles and found the stealth quality of the camera perfect for such work.

English Heritage
English Heritage
English Heritage
English Heritage
English Heritage

So, there you have it. my take on the Fujifilm x100f.

All images made on the Fujifilm x100f by me

Created By
Dayve Ward
Appreciate

Credits:

Photography by Dayve Ward

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