Food On The Move Carlynda lee

Analysis of brief:

For our Food Technology lesson, this year's theme is 'Food On The Move': our job is to create a food blog about street food that we can eat whilst 'on the move' from all over the world that we make during our lesson time. The cuisines we have tried include Mexican, Vietnamese, Japanese and Greek. For each cuisine we briefly write about the cuisine's culture, include thorough instructions on how to cook the dish, put in photographs of the cooking process, come up with personal opinions or advice etc.

Lesson 1: Mexican Burritos

Hugely influenced by the Spanish cuisine, the Mexican cuisine is immensely popular all around the world and is often combined with other cuisines to create fusion dishes. Its staple foods such as maize(corn), dried peppers (such as Chipotles, the dried version of Jalapeño), avocados, beans/frijoles form most of its signature dishes such as Guacamole, one of the most common dishes/dips of the Mexican cuisine.

Recipes on how to cook the burittoes
Photos of the Making Process and the Final Dish

Commentary on the Dish:

Overall, in my opinion the dish was rather tasty: despite the fact that I had to pick out all of the onions that I detested, the aroma and juice from the beef and tomatoes made the whole dish absolutely tantalizing. The whole dish was rather fun to make, and the enticing scents had me pretty excited to eat it. Below I will give ratings to features of the dish:

  1. Appearance: 3
  2. Aroma: 4
  3. Nutritious Value: 4
  4. Texture: 3
  5. Taste: 4

Special Considerations to take care of whilst cooking the dish:

  • If you are vegetarian or vegan, remember not to cook the beef filling: in order to replenish the lack of filling of the current burrito, you could consider making more quantities of the bean filling or you could search online for another filling. Change the quantity of the new filling depending on the amount of people that will be eating the dish (for example, if you have 7 people you could times the amount of the filling by 7 and vice versa).
  • Also, beef can get very tough and hard to chew easily if you don't watch the stove very carefully. Therefore sometimes we would cook the beef to around 60-70% so that the beef remains tender and it doesn't get too raw.
Lesson 2: Vietnamese Goi Cuon (Spring Rolls)

A cuisine that is mainly based on vegetarian dishes, the Vietnamese cuisine is one that is healthy and immensely based on noodles and vermicelli. These noodles and vermicelli are either eaten soaked in soap or cold with a sweet and sour sauce. Herbs (especially lemongrass) are also a big part of the cuisine's speciality.

Instructions on how to cook the Goi Cuon (serving for 2)
Photos of the Making Process and the Final Dish

Commentary on the Dish:

Although the texture of the rice paper rolls grew a bit too chewy and weird for my liking, the prawns were juicy and not too tough: in fact, they were the highlight of the whole dish, and I really enjoyed it. The aroma of the prawns were also a personal favourite of the dish as well. I have to say though: the sizes of the Goi Cuon were a bit too big, so that was a slight thing that made it less better than it could've been. Below I will give comments to a few features of the dish:

  1. Appearance: 4
  2. Aroma: 5
  3. Nutritious Value: 3
  4. Texture: 3
  5. Taste: 3

Special Considerations to take care of whilst cooking the dish:

  • If the prawns seem to be fully cooked judging by its colour but you want to attest to it, you could use a knife to slightly cut open the prawn. However, seeing at this stage the prawns still haven't been de-shelled, you might want to de-shell the prawns first and then slice them. If the meat is easily to cut through and is of a colour that is or is similar to white, then the prawns should be cooked.
Lesson 3: Japanese Sushi

The Japanese cuisine is heavily influenced by the Chinese cuisine, as seen at its varied uses for rice, the main staple food of the Chinese: other evidence of the impact it made is how the Japanese also use chopsticks as their cutlery, their use of soy sauce to season their dishes and soybean curd (tofu). In the 1800s, the dishes then could be sorted into 5 groups by colour (green, red, yellow, white, and black-purple) and 6 groups by taste (bitter, sour, sweet, spicy, salty, and delicate). To this day, the Japanese are still using this system for their cuisine.

Photos of the Making Process and the Final Dish

(unfortunately, my friends told me that they didn't have the recipe, so I can't put it up...)

Commentary on the Dish:

I have to say, this was my favourite dish out of the 3 so far. I've always loved Japanese dishes, and not being there at that lesson to try cooking for myself was a great regret for me. However, seeing as my friends gave me some to taste, it was still worth it.

Except for the tuna (which was to be honest very dry), the bell peppers and the rice was very tantalizing. I don't know if my friends added vinegar and sugar to the rice, but it really tasted like traditional Japanese style sushi rice and I really liked it! Unfortunately, because the dish had already been made for a while the seaweed got a bit soggy and tasted weird. But nonetheless, it was a really good dish.

  1. Appearance: 4
  2. Aroma: 3
  3. Nutritious Value: 5
  4. Texture: 3
  5. Taste: 4

Special Considerations to take care of whilst cooking the dish:

  • Remember to roll the sushi as tight as you can, or else the ingredients and filling inside will start to unravel and fall apart!
Lesson 4: Greek Flatbread

A 4000 year old cuisine, olives are a huge part of the Greek cooking methods and recipes. It is used in ways varying from cooking to the salads that they are so famous for. Herbs, carbohydrates and diverse types of vegetables are often used in its dishes, and till now continues to be a common cuisine in western restaurants.

Instructions on how to make the dish, photos of the process and the final dish

Commentary of the dish:

Actually, I think I now like this dish the best: the dough was immensely easy to make and simplistic, and most importantly the Greek Bread was really tasty, easy to carry around and just right for me. There's a very high chance that I'll make it again in my spare time as a street snack to carry around when I have to go to faraway places.

  1. Appearance: 3
  2. Aroma: 3
  3. Nutritious Value: 3
  4. Texture: 5
  5. Taste: 5

Special Considerations to take care of whilst cooking the dish:

  • Whilst kneading the dough, it would be best to breaking the dough open so that the insides can get the flour as well: doing this ensures that the core of the dough won't remain in liquid form. This tip also saves a lot of time.
Lesson 5: Indian Curry Pocket - Fusion Dish

With a long and experienced history of 5000 years, the Indian cuisine is a widely popular cuisine that hugely involves a lot of religion and culture, with spices and curry being the focal point of this cuisine. Its creative and unique cooking methods, produce and variety are also what makes it so diverse and special across all cuisines in the world.

Instructions on how to make the dish, photos of the process and the final dish

Commentary of the dish:

I'm a personal fan of curry, but I only like Japanese Curry that isn't spicy: for me, this type of Indian Curry is too much for me. The flavour of the spices were too strong and covered the natural taste of the other ingredients. Nonetheless, the wonton pockets were really good and crispy, and was a great plus for the whole dish!

  1. Appearance: 4
  2. Aroma: 4
  3. Nutritious Value: 3
  4. Texture: 4
  5. Taste: 3

Special Considerations to take care of whilst cooking the dish:

  • The curry needs to be constantly tossed in order for it to not clump together, and the oil applied to the wonton sheets cannot be too much or else they will get too soggy and hard to form a pocket for the curry to be in.
My own dish: Japanese Fried Rice Sushi - Fusion Dish

Ingredients:

  • 75-80g of Smoked Bacon
  • 2 cups of Cooked Rice
  • 1 Egg, beaten
  • 2 sheets of Seaweed(nori)
  • 1 tablespoon of Teriyaki Sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon of Sesame Oil
  • 2 teaspoons of Olive Oil

(Serves 2 people)

Instructions:

  1. First place the 2 teaspoons of olive oil onto a frying pan and set the stove to a low heat.
  2. Next, stir-fry the diced smoked bacon on the frying pan until the bacon appears slightly golden-brown and crispy.
  3. Now, add the cooked rice to the mixture as well as the previously beaten egg and toss the whole mixture for around 2-3 minutes.
  4. For flavouring, add in the tablespoon of Teriyaki Sauce. You can adjust the amount of seasoning to your liking, but I would highly recommend keeping it at the suggested amount as Teriyaki Sauce has a rather strong flavour to it. Mix the mixture for another 2-3 minutes for the flavour to blend in. For the rice to taste even better, you might want to try adding 1/2 a teaspoon of sesame oil as well. Once the fried rice is done, leave it to a side to cool.
  5. Now roll out the sheets of nori on a flat surface and spread the cooled rice evenly across the sheet. Make sure that the edge of the rice is not too close to the edge of the nori so that the rice won't be squashed out as you roll the nori to create the sushi. After that you can now roll the sushi into the shape of a sushi roll. If you don't quite understand what I mean, consider referencing the above photos and repeat for the other sheet of nori.
  6. Once you are done for both rolls of sushi, cut them into your desired quantities of sushi. You could cut them into as many pieces as you want, but I would suggest no more than 6. Now, you have your finished fried rice sushi rolls.

Evaluation:

Personally, I'm a great fan of Japanese foods, but unfortunately it wasn't my culture: however, seeing as my culture's cuisine (I'm Chinese) is really similar to the Japanese cuisine (like I said before in the Japanese food section), I decided to create a Fusion dish between the two cuisines!

The Chinese are famous for their fried rice dishes, whilst the Japanese for their sushi dishes: since both dishes include the use of rice, I decided to replace the sushi rice inside the sushi rolls with fried rice. When I searched online for similar recipes, I noticed that one of the search results had exactly what I needed. You can access it here from the button below:

Thanks for reading my blog!

Created By
Carlynda Lee
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