You Won't Believe the Amount of Laughs you Can Get From this Party Trick By: Cassidy Swart b2

Want to be the life of the party wherever you go? Well look no further, with an extreme amount of nitrous oxide you can make anyone laugh wherever you go! There are no language, social or political barriers that will stop the laughs from this trick! Just follow these steps to make your own nitrous oxide to create the newest and funniest party trick.

What is Nitrous Oxide (N2O)?

Before reaching your new state of nirvana one must first know how to get there. Your ticket to chuckle town can be found through nitrous oxide.

Nitrous Oxide is a gas made up of ammonium nitrate. It is more commonly known as laughing gas. It is colorless, but has a sweet smell and taste. The chemical equation for nitrous oxide is ammonium nitrate plus heat makes water and nitrous oxide. In this reaction, ammonium nitrate is in a solid form as salt. The outcome of the salt combined with heat is water and nitrous oxide in gas form.

NH4 NO3(s) = 2 H2O (g) + N2 0 (g)

This reaction is referred to as decomposition. Decomposition is when a chemical compound separates into simpler elements or compounds. This is shown when the Ammonium Nitrate breaks down into water and Nitrous oxide.

Bc: Ammonium Oxide (NH4 NO3) B: Water (2H2O) C: Nitrous Oxide (N2O)

How to Make Nitrous Oxide?

To make your every own happy place for a cheap price, follow these steps to make your own nitrous oxide!

Step 1: Finding Ingredients

The only ingredient in this reaction is ammonium nitrate (NH4 NO3). Ammonium nitrate is ammonium and nitric acid. The state of matter this is found in is a solid, more specifically salt. It is also mostly made of nitrogen and hydrogen. It is 33.5% nitrogen making it a main source found in fertilizer or explosives. So, to find this item you can either a) order it online b) finding your nearest fertilizer supplier or c) find a bomb and disable it

Ammonium N

Step 2: Burn Ingredients

The next step in making nitrous oxide is to add heat to the ammonium nitrate. By adding heat to the ammonium nitrate you are changing its state of matter. It is changing from a solid to a gas. Also, by doing this the chemical compound is decomposing by breaking down into water and nitrous oxide when it becomes gas. But be careful, if the ammonium nitrate is heated to an extremely high degree it may explode. This is why ammonium nitrate is so often used in explosives because of its sensitivity to heat. Click here to find out how to make your own fertilizer bomb out of ammonium nitrate!! (http://www.livescience.com/6413-fertilizer-bombs-work.html)

Step 3: Enjoy the gas

After burning your ammonium nitrate, wait for your product to cool down so that the water can condense from the gas. This should leave you with water and nitrous oxide. Next, inhale the gas for your own pleasure to experience the most filfulling form of laughter.

Keep Reading to Find Where Your Laughter Comes From

History of Nitrous Oxide

In 1772, the discovery of nitrous oxide was found by Joseph Priestley. Priestly was interested in air and its content and wanted to see the effects of different types of gases in the air. He burned ammonium nitrate to record the results of it. From this, he made nitrous oxide. He breathed in the content and felt its affects. He continued his research for the gas but later set it aside due it his near death experiences overdosing on the gas.

Later in 1798, Humphry Davy continued Priestly's research of nitrous oxide and discovered that when the gas is inhaled it takes away the feeling of pain. His discovery did not go unnoticed, but no one wanted to try to inhale the gas because they did not know the outcome of it. Then in 1844, Horace Wells revamped the research of nitrous oxide and pushed its use in the medical field. It was not until later, in the 1930, when nitrous oxide was used for medical purposes. Until then it was used for recreational uses.

Nitrous Oxide Today!

Today, nitrous oxide being used for multiple uses. Since it was discover in the late 1700s, the thought of nitrous oxide's use for medical purposes had always been a possibility. It was discovered that inhaling the gas causes pain relief and that it causes people to become unconscious, while still not feeling pain. This created a major turn in the medical field. Through the use of this gas, pain less surgeries and operations could be conducted, a new type of pain killer could be offered to pregnant moms and new opportunities to treat the sick in a more comfortable fashion was offered. Today almost every hospital and almost every dentist office uses nitrous oxide on their patients. Nitrous Oxide is now more commonly known as anesthetic. Anesthetic is just an umbrella term, today there are many different types of anesthetics and specific doctors that specialize in its usage. Overall, anesthetic solves the problem of pain.

Nitrous Oxide can also be found on farms. It is a byproduct of soil, fertilizer and plants. The ammonium nitrate in the fertilizer causes the byproduct and the plants production of oxygen aids in the excess of the gas.

Nitrous Oxide can also be used in car engines. When Nitrous Oxide is heated to a certain degree it combusts into oxygen and nitrogen. Since there is more oxygen, then is more room for fuel increasing the power of the car.

Read Below to Find out How to Die Laughing!

Laughter is the best medicine, but sometimes it can be the exact opposite. Nitrous Oxide is a "dissociative" drug. This means that when it is inhaled the user is disoriented and feels like they are having an out of body experience. The effects of the gas can be dizziness, feelings of euphoria, laughing and slight hallucinations. When the gas dissolves into the bloodstream, the brain becomes disoriented. The effects of the gas only last a couple seconds, so within reason the drugs does not have a big effect. But, in unhealthy conditions and in extreme amounts, an overdosage of this gas can lead to death. The gas can be easily found in empty whip cream bottles and in car engines, so BEWARE!

Why Nitrous Oxide is No Laughing Matter

Nitrous Oxide is mostly known for its medical usage, but it also is know in the farming industry. It in produced from soil and fertilizer and is used in greenhouses. It is 300 times stronger than carbon dioxide, making it an essential player in the global warming epidemic. It also damages the ozone layer. As a byproduct, Nitrous Oxide is now a new major concern in the destruction of our ozone layer. Due to its high nitrogen content and its powerful makeup, Nitrous Oxide is now being watched by scientists, as they try to figure out a way to stop this gas from destroying our earth.

Where in the World can I Find this Gas?

Nitrous Oxide can be found in many places around the world. It is a resource used by people in different cultures because of its multiple uses. It is accessible to people of any income. For example, to find anesthetic go to your local hospital or dentist to get this gas. It may also be found in certain car engines to increase its speed. In other parts of the world, it can be found on farms in fertilizer or in the byproducts of soil and plants. You can find it in the air by farm lands or greenhouses. Also, find it in empty whipped cream bottles.

For me persoanlly, I can find it at my local hospital, Memorial Hospital or at my dentist, Cordera Dentistry. I can also find it in my fridge in the whipped cream bottle I have left over from a Christmas Party.

Where can you find your "laughing gas" today?

Works Cited

"How to Make Nitrous Oxide or Laughing Gas." About Education. N.p., 17 Oct. 2015. Web. 6 Dec. 2016.

Editors of Encylopedia Britanncia. "Ammonium Nitrate." Encyclopaedia Britannica. N.p., 20 July 1998. Web.

"Does Nitrous Oxide Help an Engine Perform Better?" How Stuff Works. N.p., n.d. Web.

Zuck, David, Peter Ellis, and Alan Drensfield. "Nitrous Oxide: Are You Having a Laugh." RSC. N.p., Mar. 2012. Web.

Editors of Encylopedia Britanncia. "Ammonium Nitrate." Encyclopaedia Britannica. N.p., 20 July 1998. Web.

"What Is Nitrous Oxide?" Drug Science UK. N.p., n.d. Web.

"Nitrous Oxide." SEPA. N.p., n.d. Web.

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