Children in Elizabethan kaylee distefano

Children were often considered miniature versions of adults. They were expected to be kind, respectful, and responsible. They're taught to always stand up when they speak and to never interrupt anyone. (Jones, Madeline. Growing up in Stuart times. G.B.:Batsford, 1979. Print.). (Jones 9).

Christening, Portrait of A Mother And Child, c.1595 (oil on canvas) . oil on canvas.Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/108_4076438/1/108_4076438/cite. Accessed 13 Mar 2017.

Children were usually raised by nurses because their father was usually busy with work type things and their mother was usually busy with things around the house. The nurses usually cared for the children until they were around 6 or 7 years old. They only saw their parents at special times and they were often set ahead of time. (Jones, Madeline. Growing up in Stuart times. G.B.:Batsford, 1979. Print.). (Jones 15).

Portrait of two young women, standing, each with a child in her arms. The two women are wearing aprons and bonnets. They are probably the children's nannies. Photography. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/153_2378290/1/153_2378290/cite. Accessed 13 Mar 2017.

Infant mortality was very common during the Elizabethan era. Many common causes of infant mortality was disease, lack of effective medical care, and unhygienic conditions. The infant mortality rate was estimated to be at 33 percent. A quarter of children died before before their tenth year, an eighth before their first year (Medici, 31)

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL, c1880. - A grammar school classroom in Brooklyn, New York. Wood engraving, c1880.. Fine Art. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/140_1681759/1/140_1681759/cite. Accessed 13 Mar 2017.

All children were brought up to obey their parents and be very polite. They had to stand up when they spoke to their parents and if they interrupted their parents there were punishments. Most fathers believed that it was their job to correct their children, like beat them, if they misbehave. Strict parents expected their children to stand in their presence, that's why most children didn't have chairs. If the children misbehaved, they were beaten by their father. (Jones, Madeline. Growing up in Stuart times. G.B.: Batsford, 1979. Print.). (Jones 9).

Children's education depended on their social class. Laborers were usually illiterate, but members of the middle class could attend grammar school. Only boys could attend school, not girls. There were two types of schools, public, which was free and supported by the wealthy, and private which required a fee. The children of the nobility continued their education at a university. (Medici 29)

Works Cited

  • Jones, Madeline. Growing up in Stuart times. G.B.: Batsford, 1979. Print
  • Medici, Anthony G. "Society and Culture in Shakespeare’s Day." The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare, by William Baker and Kenneth Womack, vol. 1, Facts on File, 2012, pp. 24-45. Facts On File Library of World Literature. Gale Virtual Reference Library

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