Lifestyle effects of Brexit so far British Prime Minister Theresa May is slated to trigger negotiations for Brexit in March 2017, but the people of England have already started experiencing lifestyle changes.

The fallen pound was one of the foremost effect of Brexit as it recorded a three year low value against the dollar. The fallen currency has had far reaching effects for the people of United Kingdom. International travels have become an expensive affair. International tourists, however, saved as much as 40% of their travel expenses by switching their travel destination from Japan to UK in the days after Brexit, reported Bloomberg. Luxury product brands like Burberry saw record sales as foreign tourists made hay of the fallen pound.

For the citizens of United Kingdom, items such as Marmite, a favourite British bread spread vanished from TESCO aisles as TESCO refuted Unilever’s attempt to raise Marmite price. This is just one of the few manifestations of post-Brexit food price rise.

"Except the Unilever story has managed to obscure the reality, which is this: when it comes to food, Brexit has utterly screwed us all,”

Jay Rayner, feature writer and restaurant critic at The Guardian.

Prior to Brexit, Britain’s dairy industry was facing a crisis due to low milk production, poor grass quality and rising feed costs which lead to shortage of fresh dairy products like mozzarella cheese. The low production and increased export costs incentivized farmers to opt for produces which will reap benefits in the export market. The result has been escalated costs for restaurant and food chain owners for basics such as cheese and chocolate.

“I have no idea how negotiations will affect my business and in what ways, so I have no plan in place. With regards to food costs, if they continue to escalate then we will probably have to pass on some of the cost to our customers by raising our prices in the shop,”

Simon Badrock, a food retailer who owns Burrito Picante, a small food outlet in Altricham Cheshire.

“The day the results came out I was an undergrad at University of Essex and I could feel a buzz/unrest on campus and we had a talk with our chancellor where we were told not to panic. The conversations from that day onwards changed. Be it at a social or academic space, it came up in conversations all the time,” says Ankita Gupta, a masters student at University of London.

“The day the results came out I was an undergrad at University of Essex and I could feel a buzz/unrest on campus and we had a talk with our chancellor where we were told not to panic. The conversations from that day onwards changed. Be it at a social or academic space, it came up in conversations all the time,”

Ankita Gupta, a masters student at University of London.

With special inputs by Alexsandra Ganuszko

Published first on sharanyamunsi.net

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