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TAG Line September 10, 2021

Two F-16A Air-Defense Fighter (ADF) Fighting Falcons of the North Dakota Air National Guard's 178th Fighter Squadron, 119th Fighter Wing, perform an early morning Combat Air Patrol (CAP) over the Washington, D.C. area, November 17, 2001. The Happy Hooligans flew CAP missions for several months over the capital after the attacks. Clearly visible below and between the two jets is the Pentagon. The aircraft were piloted by Maj. Brad Derrig (992) and Maj. Dave Hill (006). (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Greg L. Davis, 20th Communications Squadron)

Hooligans' Historic 9-11 Role

On September 11, 2001, shortly after the two World Trade Center towers were struck by hijacked airliners flown by terrorists, Maj. Dean Eckmann, Maj. Brad Derrig and Capt. Craig Borgstrom, were scrambled in their F-16 Fighting Falcons from Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. (National Guard story by Chief Master Sgt. David Lipp, 119th Wing)

These Airmen were N.D. Air National Guard (NDANG) pilots from the 178th Fighter Squadron where the Happy Hooligans operated an alert detachment. These pilots and their aircraft were among the first military responders to take to the skies in response to the terrorist attacks that day. Originally headed to New York City, they were diverted to the nation's capital where they patrolled over the capital alone for almost an hour before more aircraft joined them. Watch Eckmann's account of that day.

Technical Sgt. Stephen Crawford, left, and Staff Sgt. Chad Campbell push aircraft weapons into place at the 119th Fighter Wing, Detachment 1, Langley Air Force Base, Virginia, during the days following Sept. 11, 2001.

Meanwhile, back at the Fargo Air National Guard base, Maj. Rick Gibney flew a two-seater F-16 to Bozeman, Montana. His mission was to transport Ed Jacoby, New York's director of emergency management, who was at a conference, to Albany, New York, before joining the other Hooligans at Langley Air Force Base.

An aerial view of the Pentagon, September 13, 2011, two days after the hijacked American Airlines Flight 77, a Boeing 757, hit the building.

Two F-16A Air-Defense Fighter (ADF) Fighting Falcons of the 178th Fighter Squadron, North Dakota Air National Guard, are seen in a turn during an early morning Combat Air Patrol mission over the east coast of the U.S. on November 11, 2001. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Greg L. Davis, 20th Communications Squadron)

A majority of the 119th Fighter Wing was mobilized in place on September 12, 2001 as were other reserve component Air Wings across the nation.

Master Sergeant Brad Johnson supervises the weapons loading at the North Dakota Air National Guard Base, Fargo, N.D., Sept. 11, 2001, as U.S. fighter aircraft were prepped to defend the nation if called upon.

Two F-16A Air-Defense Fighter (ADF) Fighting Falcons of the 178th Fighter Squadron, North Dakota Air National Guard, lead an F-15C in formation over the Washington, D.C. area during an early morning Combat Air Patrol mission, November 17, 2001. The F-15C is assigned to the 27th Fighter Squadron, Langley Air Force Base, Virginia. Visible below the jets are numerous Washington, DC landmarks. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Greg L. Davis, 20th Communications Squadron)

In the days that followed the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, President George W. Bush asked state governors to supplement domestic airport security. Airmen of the 119th Security Forces Squadron were deployed to airports to provide security for Fargo, Grand Forks, Bismarck, Jamestown, Devils Lake, Dickinson, Minot and Williston for three days. The N.D. Army Guard also provided security to state airports.

Click to read more about the National Guard's response on 9-11.

Airmen of the 119th Security Forces Squadron, 119th Fighter Wing, Airman 1st Class Derek Breuer, left, and Tech. Sgt. James Casias, provide security at Hector International Airport, September 27, 2001. These Hooligans were among the first National Guard members in the nation to provide airport security at commercial airports following the attacks of September 11, 2001. They provided airport security for Fargo, Grand Forks, Bismarck, Jamestown, Devils Lake, Dickinson, Minot and Williston for three days upon the request by President George W. Bush to state governors to augment commercial airport security throughout the U.S.

Summary of Hooligans' 9-11 actions to include Vice President Dick Cheney's comments.

Since the 2001 terrorist attacks on America, the N.D. National Guard has mobilized over 4,900 Soldiers and nearly 3,000 Airmen in support of the Global War on Terrorism. Currently, the NDNG has about 525 North Dakota Guardsmen mobilized overseas and in the United States (or preparing to mobilize) with more than 3,000 in state for emergency response and national defense.

Commemorating Happy Hooligans History

Rick Herter of Kalamazoo, Michigan, an aviation artist and participant in the U.S. Air Force Art Program, unveiled his painting "First Pass, Defenders Over Washington" at the Pentagon one week before the first anniversary of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, that killed nearly 3,000 people.

Rick Herter's painting "First Pass, Defenders Over Washington" depicts a N.D. Air National Guard F16 Falcon flying over the Pentagon moments after a highjacked airliner hit it on September 11, 2001.

Rick Herter, center, discusses his painting "First Pass, Defenders Over Washington" with U.S. Rep. Earl Pomeroy, right, and U.S. Sen. Kent Conrad of North Dakota, at the Pentagon, September 4, 2002. (National Guard photo by Sgt. 1st Class Tom Roberts, National Guard Bureau, Public Affairs Support Element)
Artist Rick Herter talks with an Air Force officer at the Pentagon, September 4, 2002, after the unveiling of Herter's paintings "First Pass, Defenders Over Washington" and "Ground Zero, Eagles on Station" (background). These paintings highlighted the response by the N.D. Air National Guard to Washington, D.C., and the Massachusetts Air National Guard, New York City, respectfully. (National Guard photo by Sgt. 1st Class Tom Roberts, National Guard Bureau, Public Affairs Support Element)

My 9-11 Story

"I was sitting in the G-3 mobilization office when it went off and we ran to the main G3 office to view the TV broadcast. I remember them immediately calling for force protection and I was sent to the Bismarck Airport. So much changed after that day, it was the beginning of a new normal." Col. Warren Pauling, G-1, Director of Personnel.
"I was working at a factory in West Fargo as a member of the North Dakota National Guard. I knew we would be going somewhere after the attacks. The Guard was no longer just on weekends." Sgt. 1st Class Kristopher Anderson, 131st Military Police Battalion.
"I was working at Bobcat and a member of the North Dakota Air National Guard. At work we heard the news flash on the radio but as the story unfolded we knew something serious was happening. I contacted my chain of command to see if I could help. Surprisingly when this happen I felt vulnerable but more then ready to serve." Master Sgt. Dale Franchuk, Joint Force Headquarters.
"I was working in the North Dakota National Guard's Central Issue shop. We all wanted to run to a TV to see what was going on. I went to my boss to volunteer in case they were sending people to the crash sites. I just wanted to help." Staff Sgt. Jason Kalvoda, 957th Engineer Company (Multi-role Bridge).
"I was working in the construction business at the time. Once I saw the coverage on TV, I decided to serve so I enlisted in National Guard September 28, 2001. I truly wanted to join the fight." Master Sgt. Derrick Owen, 131st Military Police Battalion.
"I was a student at Bismarck State College and waiting to leave for Army basic training. I felt empowered to become a Soldier but also scared for what was to come next. Looking back it was an tragedy that united the country and our faith in each other." Capt. Vanessa Lennick, 68th Troop Command.

Facility Analysis

Two soldiers from the North Dakota Army National Guard Military Funeral Honors participated in a flag ceremony, which opened the 2021 Native American Hall of Honor Hall of Honor induction ceremony. (National Guard story and photos by retired Chief Warrant Officer 5 Kiel Skager, N.D. National Guard Visual Information)

The ceremony was held at the North Dakota Heritage Center and State Museum auditorium, Bismarck, September 9, 2021. Sergeant Kevin Curley, 164th Engineer Battalion, and a proud member of the Navajo tribe, carried the U.S. flag while Sgt. Tyler Weichel, 817th Engineer Company, carried the North Dakota state flag. The Soldiers were joined by members of local and national Native American organizations. The flags were presented and posted while native singers conducted a traditional flag song and ceremonial dance.

Two Soldiers from the North Dakota National Guard Funeral Honors carry the U.S. and North Dakota state flags as they follow the leader bearing the traditional Eagle Staff during the posting of the colors at the Native American Hall of Honor 2021 Inductee Ceremony, North Dakota Heritage Center and State Museum auditorium, Bismarck, September 9, 2021.

The 2021 Hall of Honor inductees were: Chief Sitting Bull (Legendary); Ms. Lydia Sage-Chase (Leadership); Mr. Dave Dauphinais (Veteran/Military.) The Native American Hall of Honor annually recognizes North Dakota Native Americans who have contributed significantly or demonstrated extreme dedication to their heritage, culture and awareness within the community.

Sergeant Kevin Curley, 164th Engineer Battalion, and Sgt. Tyler Weichel, 817th Engineer Company, carry the U.S. and North Dakota state flags, respectfully, during the posting of the colors at the Native American 2021 Hall of Honor induction ceremony, North Dakota Heritage Center and State Museum auditorium, Bismarck, September 9, 2021.

Soldiers from the North Dakota National Guard Funeral Honors stand at attention with the U.S. and North Dakota state flags during the national anthem at the Native American 2021 Hall of Honor induction ceremony.

Brats for the Brave

The Military Affairs Committee of the Bismarck-Mandan Chamber EDC hosted their annual "Brats with the Brave" at the Raymond J. Bohn armory, Bismarck, September 10, 2021. (National Guard story and photos by Staff Sgt. Ashley Johlfs, N.D. National Guard Visual Information)

This event, sponsored by local businesses is a salute to the service and sacrifice of military members, first responders and medical personnel.

Suzane Richards, Soldier and Family Readiness Specialist, serves brats to N.D. National Guard Soldiers, Bismarck, September 10, 2011.

Shyla Wesson, Lead Soldier and Family Readiness Specialist, serves brats to a N.D. National Guard Soldier, Bismarck, September 10, 2011.

N.D. National Guard Soldiers line up for chow at the Brats for the Brave event, Bismarck, September 10, 2011.

Command Sgt. Maj. Derek Heck, state command sergeant major for the N.D. National Guard, visits with Delton Steele, honorary commander for the Joint Forces Headquarters, N.D. National Guard at the Brats for the Brave event, Bismarck, September 10, 2021.

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ND National Guard Public Affairs Office
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