The Cotton Gin BY: laura Mcclure

The Cotton Gin helped the slaves so they didn't have to separate the cotton from the seeds. But, it made the people have/want to buy more slaves. This affected the people directly because it made more slaves be bought and people didn't want to move because they wanted to keep there slaves and land. It also affected the country be making it easier for people/slaves to sort the seeds and cotton by just rotating a lever.

"After the invention of the cotton gin, the yeild of raw cotton doubled each decade after 1800. www.eliwhitney.org "There whitney quickly learned that Southern planters were in desperate need of a way to make the growing of cotton profitable." "Elie Whitney invented the gin in 1794, and by 1850 the tool had changed the face of southern agriculture" www.archives.gov The simple city of the invention-which could be powered by man, animal, or water-caused it to be widely copied despite Whitney's patient. www.britnannica.com

This change happened in 1793. This change was made to make separating cotton and the seeds easier and faster for anyone. The parts where easy to repair because it could be taken apart.

Other things that where happening during this time were: 1st hot-air balloon flight on Jan. 9, 1793. Jan. 16, 1793 French King Louis XVI sentenced to death. Jan. 21, 1793 Prussia and Russia signed partition treaty, dividing Poland.

This Cotton Gin affected the south more because of farming. It made people not want to move, because they wanted to keep there land and slaves. They would expand there land and got more slaves.

Credits:

Created with images by virgohobbs - "Cotton Gin at the John Blue Cotton Festival" • Hans - "clematis vitalba pods soft" • mlcombs - "cotton field agriculture" • wuestenigel - "Zangen aus Schokolade" • Mamyoung - "cotton field tn"

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