Nigeria Kimberly Ramirez & Jessenia Rodriguez

Food

The bigger the yam the manlier a man is & the more capable he is of being able to care for his family. They farm yams and eat kola nut. They have banana trees and when times are good the locusts would descend upon them

(Source: Things Fall Apart) .

Culture

They have a "week of peace," a time when no one is allowed to disrupt the peace or do anything aggressive. In chapter 5 of the book Things Fall Apart, Okonkwo asks who killed this tree and his wife responded that she had taken a few leaves to wrap food. He beats her heavily, breaking the peace and receiving punishment. He had to take food and money to the goddess of the earth in order to gain forgiveness.

Gifts from a man to a woman must be said to come from the man’s mother, wife, sister, or other female relative, never from the man himself.

Muslim 50%, Christian 40%, indigenous beliefs 10%

(Source: http://www.commisceo-global.com/country-guides/nigeria-guide)

Family

The man is the head of the family and is supposed to provide for it and protect it. While the women (plural) have to take care of the children, cook, clean, and help farm the yams. In Okonkwo's household, if the little boys begin to show weakness or show any sign that they'll be lazy, he beats them until he thinks that it's enough. The little girls just do what they're told and are raised to do. Get married have kids and so on.

(Source: Things Fall Apart)

Hospitality

If invited to dinner at someone’s home then bring fruit, nuts or chocolates for the host. Never show up empty handed.

When invited it is custom to part a kola nut into two and share it with your guest. The kola nut is mixed with alligator pepper and eaten. This was served as an appetizer as part of the welcoming ritual.

(Source: Things Fall Apart)

Created By
Jessenia Rodriguez
Appreciate

Credits:

Created with images by ralph_rybak - "africa twilight botswana" • iainswife - "yam potato white" • juggadery - "banana tree" • jill111 - "family children woman" • Fæ - "Village Council House, Calabar, late 19th century (imp-cswc-GB-237-CSWC47-LS2-042)"

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