Double Victory By Suet Ma, YueYi Liu 1st period

ASIAN AMERICAN

People line-up of newly arrived evacuees outside this mess hall at noon. The barracks in background were just built for family units.
One type of barracks for family use. These were formerly the stalls for race horses. Each family is assigned to two small rooms, the inner one, of which, has no outside door nor window.
At the top is before the evacuation, a crowded classroom with many Japanese kids. At the bottom is the same class without the Japanese students when the evacuation happened.
These field laborers of Japanese ancestry at Wartime Civil Control Administration Control Station are receiving final instructions regarding their evacuation to an Assembly center in three days.
December 7, 1941 the Japanese military launched a surprise attack on the US Naval base at Pearl Harbor.
Japanese American farm workers at the Tule Lake Relocation Center, in Newell, California. Photo taken in 1942 or 1943.

AFRICAN AMERICAN

A group of African American troops surround a farm house in a town in France, as they prepare to eliminate a German sniper holding up an advance.
African American troops of the 24th Infantry, attached to the Americal Division, wait to advance behind a tank assault on the Japanese, along Empress Augusta Bay on Bougainville.
African American women became the U.S. Army nurses. These women were newly arrived, and wait to disembark as the gangplank is lowered to the dock.
African American women employed at Savannah Quartermaster Depot, Savannah, Georgia.
The African American janitors of the plant maintenance department in North America's Kansas City factory in V-formation as they start out on their daily tasks.

Four Similarities:

  • They both faced discrimination.
  • They were not hired in specific jobs.
  • There were segregated schools for Asian American, African American and Whites.
  • They both served in the U.S. armed forces during World War II.

Three Differences:

  • Many Japanese were forced to live in internment camp.
  • Most Asian American served as translator and most African American served in the air forces during the war.
  • There were more African American served in the army than Asian American.

Slogan for African American:

"Fight for freedom, On call 24 hours"

Slogan for Asian American

"Don't give up our race"

African American

1.HOW WERE THEY TREATED?

Many factories hesitated to have African American.

2.HOW DID THEY RESPOND TO SUCH TREATMENT?

A. Philip Randolph organized a March to protest the discrimination in the defense industry.

3. DID THEY CONTRIBUTE ANYTHING TO THE CAUSE OF THE WAR (WWII)?

145,00 black men served in the U.S Air Force.

4.WHAT IS YOUR ANALYSIS? OPINION? REACTION TO THE ACTION(S) TAKEN BY EACH COMMUNITY?

I can't believe that discrimination toward African American still existed when African American were fighting for the U.S.

1.How were they treated?

After the attack of Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt issued Executive Order No. 9066. which forced over 110,000 Japanese Americans to leave their homes and begin sent to live in the internment camps.

2.How did they respond to such treatment?

Japanese Americans tried to prove their loyalty towards the country by fighting for the U.S during WWII.

3. Did they contribute anything to the cause of the war (WWII)?

Over 6000 Asian Americans served as translators during the war

4.WhAT IS YOUR ANALYSIS? OPINION? REACTION TO THE ACTION(S) TAKEN BY EACH COMMUNITY?

I am surprised that Asian American did not fight against the mistreatment but fight for the U.S in WWII to prove their loyalty.

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