March on Washington BY: Justin Evans

(S and Primary Source): Martin Luther King and others called for all Americans to join them in Washington to demand a national minimum wage, to prevent compromise against such legislation, and also to demand a federal massive works and training program for anybody. (March on Washington for Jobs)

This is a announcement that was put around the whole south about the March on Washington.

Q: The March on Washington impacted the south, because it lead to the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that states "guaranteeing equal voting rights, outlawing discrimination in restaurants, theaters, and other public accommodations involved in interstate commerce, and encouraging school desegregation." (March on Washington)

P: The "big six" fully supported the Civil Rights bill and knew the march would help support the bill. Also John F. Kennedy really knew that the march would give more support for his bill. (The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom National archives)

(Q and Primary Source): When John Lewis gave his speech on Lincoln Memorial he encourages the crowd saying "We won't stop now. All of the forces of Eastland, Barnett and Wallace won't stop this revolution. The next time we march, we won't march on Washington, but will march through the South, through the Heart of Dixie, the way Sherman did. We will make the action of the past few months look petty. And I say to you, WAKE UP AMERICA!!"

P:The idea of the March on Washington was from Philip Randolph, but the first time he proposed it to civil rights activist he didn't get a big response. After a couple of months the activist supported it and the "big six" started to plan the march. (Official Program)

This is the "big six". The "big six" were Philip Randolph, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., James Farmer Jr., John Lewis, and Roy Wilkins.

S: The March on Washington was very joyful with more than 200,00 people both black and white. The march contained songs, prayers, speeches and lead to the most important speech of the march was the speech addressed by Dr. Martin Luther King called "I Have a Dream". It was a powerful speech and it is great fully appreciated today. (History.com Staff)

Young women singing at the March on Washington.
Martin Luther King Jr. giving his well known speech 'I Have a Dream".
Military Police control crowd at the March on Washington

Q: The congress was arguing saying "the March should be prohibited as an “illegal assembly” and they predicted violence in the streets." (The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom)

Works Cited

A.Philip Randolph / Photo / 1963. Photograph. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. Accessed 31 Mar 2017.

"Civil Rights Act (1964)." Welcome to OurDocuments.gov. N.p., n.d. Web. 31 Mar. 2017.

Civil Rights Leaders. Photographer. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. Accessed 31 Mar 2017.

Hamlet, Janice D. "March on Washington." The American Mosaic: The African American Experience, ABC-CLIO, 2017,Accessed 21 Mar. 2017.

History.com Staff. "March on Washington." History.com. A&E Television Networks, 2009. Web. 23 Mar. 2017.

"John Lewis: Address at the March on Washington (1963)." American History, ABC-CLIO, 2017, . Accessed 30 Mar. 2017.

Light, John. "Meet the 1963 March on Washington Organizers John Lewis Chairman, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC)." BillMoyers.com. N.p., 25 July 2013. Web. 31 Mar. 2017.

Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908 - 1973), Referred to as LBJ, Served as the 36th President of the United States from 1963 to 1969. Lyndon Johnson Signing the Civil Rights Act, 2 July 1964. Martin Luther King Jnr. Looks on behind the President . Photography. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. Accessed 30 Mar 2017.

March on Washington 1963 / Photo. Photograph. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. Accessed 30 Mar 2017.

"March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Announcement." Martin Luther King, Jr. AND THE GLOBAL FREEDOM STRUGGLE. Stanford University, n.d. Web. 21 Mar. 2017.

"The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom." National Archives and Records Administration. National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Web. 29 Mar. 2017.

"March on Washington." Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 26 Aug. 2015. Accessed 23 Mar. 2017.

MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. - (1929-1968). American Cleric and Civil Rights Leader. Delivering His Celebrated 'I Have a Dream' Speech at the March on Washington, 28 August 1963.. Fine Art. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. Accessed 31 Mar 2017.

Military Police Control Crowd At The March On Washington. Photographer. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. Accessed 31 Mar 2017.

"Official Program for the March on Washington (1963)." Welcome to OurDocuments.gov. National Archives and Records Administration, n.d. Web. 23 Mar. 2017.

Okolo, Osaremen. "John F. Kennedy's Legacy Resides in African-American History." Harvard Political Review. N.p., 05 Nov. 2015. Web. 30 Mar. 2017.

Washington, D.C.: August 28, 1963.The Civil Rights March on Washington Showing Crowds of People on The Mall, Starting at the Lincoln Memorial, Going around the Reflecting Pool, and Continuing to the Washington Monument.. Photograph. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. Accessed 30 Mar 2017.

Young Women Singing At The March On Washington. Photographer. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. Accessed 31 Mar 2017.

Created By
Justin Evans
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