Louis Braille By: Yash dattani

Louis Braille

January 4, 1809-January 6, 1852

Louis tried to be like his Dad, but it went very wrong; he grabbed an awl, a sharp tool for making holes, and the tool slid and hurt his eye. The wound got infected, and the infection spread, and soon, Louis was blind in both eyes.

Louis trimmed Barbier's 12 dots into 6, ironed out the system by the time he was 15, then published the first-ever braille book in 1829. In 1837, he added symbols for math and music. He assigned different combinations of dots to different letters and punctuation marks, with a total of 64 symbols. He had invented a language for the blind, Braille.

Louis Braille invented Braille, the language for the blind.

Even at the Royal Institution, where Louis taught after he graduated, braille wasn't taught until after his death. Braille began to spread worldwide in 1868, when a group of British men, now known as the Royal National Institute for the Blind, took up the cause.

Louis tried to be like his Dad, but it went very wrong; he grabbed an awl, a sharp tool for making holes, and the tool slid and hurt his eye. The wound got infected, and the infection spread, and soon, Louis was blind in both eyes.

Tuberculosis forced Louis Braille to retire from teaching, his six-dot method was well on its way to widespread acceptance.

Several awards that famous people get today are called,"The Louis Braille Award"

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