Butterflies Jamie MELENDEZ

Overall Rationale: This text set is focusing on butterflies at a second grade level. It will help students understand the process of metamorphosis, migration, and the body parts of a butterfly and their purposes. These resources all have their unique touches to help teach the different science standards regarding animals life cycles, their habitat, and adaptations. This text set will help students build on background knowledge from previous grades and go a bit more in depth in some of these books. The text set reading levels range from kindergarten to fourth grade level. Even though this is focus on science concepts. I incorporated language arts standards and activities to help strengthen reading fluency and writing skills.

Charlie The Caterpillar, written by Dom Deluise , illustrated by Christopher Santoro, published by Aladdin in 1993, ISBN: 9780671796075, 40 pages, fiction.

Summary: Charlie a caterpillar who is happy to be alive sets out to explore the world. As he explores the world he comes across various groups of different animals who are playing and having fun together and asks if he can play. Every time they were mean to him and called him ugly. He wondered if he would ever have a friend. Charlie was sad from being called ugly and he spun a cocoon and took a nap. He woke up a beautiful butterfly. He came across every set of animals who had were mean to him before. They all to play with him because he was beautiful. Charlie said no to every single one because he knew they weren’t good friends. Charlie came across another caterpillar named Katie. She was sad because everyone called her ugly. Charlie tells her he will play with her and explained everything about becoming a butterfly. They become the best of friends and did everything the other animals had been playing.

Teaching points: standard: RL.2.3 – Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges, big five component: phonics, six language arts: reading. Students will read this book and discuss the characters, the challenges, and how the caterpillar gets to be a butterfly. I will use this text as my anchor text for the life cycle and students will monitor their understanding.

The Very Hungry Caterpillar, written by Eric Carle, illustrated by Eric Carle, published by Putnam 1969, ISBN: 0-399-22690-7, 22 pages, fiction children's picture book

Summary: This beautifully illustrated book starts with a small caterpillar who comes out of an egg. He eats almost everything he comes in contact with. The caterpillar gets big and fat and spins into a cocoon. Out of the cocoon flies out a butterfly.

Teaching points: standard: SL.2.1- Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and text with peers and adults in small and larger groups. Big five elements: Comprehension , six language arts: Speaking. Because this book will be on the easy spectrum for second graders I would have them read it. Students will be able to retell the story in sequence. This book will be a starting point on our lesson about butterflies and a way of tapping into their prior knowledge.

Velma Gratch and The Way Cool Butterfly: written by Alan Madison, illustrated by Kevin Hawkes, published by Schwartz and Wade in 2007, ISBN:9780375835971, 40 pages, fiction

Summary: This book is about a girl named, Velma Gratch who starts first grade. She has two older sisters who everyone remembers. However, no one remembers Velma. Velma begins to misbehave to get attention in school, which gets her sent to the principals office. Velma falls in love with butterflies and learns all about them before a class trip to the butterfly conservatory. A monarch butterfly lands on her finger and remains there for days after, even through all her activities in school. Velma and the butterfly become so popular that it becomes distracting. The school principal tells Velma that she needs to let the butterfly go. Velma takes it to the conservatory and lets it go with the rest of the monarchs.

Teaching points: Standard: RL.2.4 – Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song. Big five component: vocabulary, six language arts: viewing. This would be a teacher read-aloud focusing on the descriptive languages the book has. Students will be able to connect the description to the beautiful images in this book. Teacher will also point out the play on language in this book. I can use this as a transition into monarch butterflies and their migration. Students will color a butterfly and write a descriptive sentence about their butterfly.

Monarch Butterfly: written by Gail Gibbons, illustrated by Gail Gibbons, published by Holiday House 1989, ISBN: 9780823409099, 32 pages, nonfiction

Summary: This book covers the life cycle of the monarch butterfly. It describes their habits and their migration patterns. The book discusses the body of the monarch butterfly. This books stands out because at the back of the book it has activities for the students.

Teaching points: Standard: ELA-W.2.7 – Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science observations). Science standard: 3-LS4-3. Construct an argument with evidence that in a particular habitat some organisms can survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all. Big five component: vocabulary, six language arts: speaking/listening. We would discuss as a whole some of the new vocabulary and focus on the migration period for the monarchs'. I will have students do a graphic organizer and share a few facts specifically regarding the monarch butterfly. We will use this later. When students do a end of the unit foldable about butterflies.

Butterfly Butterfly: written by Cammie Ho, illustrated by Cammie Ho , published by Phonic Monic Books in 2016, ISBN: 9781943241033, 27 pages, nonfiction

Summary: This book starts out from the egg to the butterfly. It describes how the life cycle works in a rhyme. When the butterfly comes out of the chrysalis, it talks about what the butterfly eats and where it goes in the winter. Also, how the butterflies lay eggs in batches and the process starts over.

Teaching points: Standard: ELA-SL.1.2 – Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media. Science standard: NGSS-K-LS1-1. Use observations to describe patterns of what plants and animals (including humans) need to survive. Big Five component: phonemic awareness, six Language arts: reading. Students will read this book on their own. Students will be able to understand the life cycle of a butterfly before we learn what the word metamorphosis is. We will use the song form of this book to sing as a way to remember the life cycle. Students will discuss what the butterfly needs to survive.

Waiting for Wings, written by Lois Ehlert, illustrated by Lois Ehlert, published by Scholastic in 2001, ISBN:9780152026080, 40 pages, nonfiction

Summary: This book is also using rhyming to describe the life cycle from egg to butterfly. This book talks about the habitat where the eggs are and how the caterpillars look for a place with no wind. I love that it has pages for body parts of a butterfly, a flower, and other butterfly information. It discusses how butterfly drink from the flowers and get fat and then go lay eggs in a safe habitat.

Teaching points: Standard: W.1.7 Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., explore a number of “how-to” books on a given topic and use them to write a sequence of instructions). Big five component: Phonemic awareness, Six language arts: writing. I would use this as a building book on the life cycle of a butterfly. I will have students create a sequence flip book on the butterfly's life cycle. In the back of this book it goes over the parts of the butterfly. Students will label their butterfly in their flip book based on the body parts of the butterfly.

Butterflies for Kiri: written by Kathryn Falwell, illustrated by Kathryn Falwell, published by Lee & Low Books in 2003, ISBN:9781584301004, 32 pages, fiction

Summary: Kiri loves arts and crafts and on her birthday she gets an origami set from her aunt. Kiri’s initial attempts at origami does not go as planned. Kiri becomes upset at the fact that she can’t do it.Kiri loves arts and crafts and on her birthday she gets an origami set from her aunt. Kiri’s initial attempts at origami does not go as planned. Kiri becomes upset at the fact that she can’t do it. She sets aside her origami paper and begins to practice with regular lined paper. Her attempts still continue to be unsuccessful, but she got better and better every time. Kiri finally manages to fold a butterfly using her colorful origami paper. Using some of the origami paper, Kiri makes flower shaped cut-outs and combines it to make an amazing piece of art that showcase many of Kiri's artistic talents.

Teaching points: Standard: RL.1.1 – Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. Big five component: comprehension, six language arts: viewing. Students will discuss in groups how the story relates to butterflies that we are learning. Students will build a butterfly origami as the book gives directions on how to make on. We will use this as a fun activity but also discuss previous learned components, like body parts of the butterfly. This book we will focus on the images and analyze how they relate to the story. Students will make inferences about the images.

Becoming Butterflies: written by Anne Rockwell, illustrated by Megan Halsey, published by Walker and Company in 2002, ISBN:9780802787972, 32 pages, nonfiction

Summary: Mrs. Dana brought in 3 caterpillars, milkweed plant in a pot, and an insect house. She explains to her kids just how butterflies are born. She explains the cycle that caterpillars go through before they become a butterfly as the kids prepare the caterpillars new home. Over the next few weeks the kids watch as the caterpillars transform and progress through their life cycle. One day, the butterflies hatch and they released them. Mrs. Dana shows the kids where the butterflies would end up in Mexico. The kids wrote a letter to the kids in Mexico, and those kids replied with a picture of butterflies covering a tree. Mrs. Dana’s kids wondered if any of the butterflies in the picture were one of the ones they care for and freed.

Teaching points: Standard: ELA-W.2.7 – Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science observations). Science standard NGSS- 2-LS4-1. Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats. Big five component: comprehension, six language arts: visually representing. Students will literally grow a class caterpillar like this class did. Students will collect data as the days go. Students will also use a paragraph graphic organizer to write about the butterflies.

The Prince of Butterflies: written by Bruce Coville, illustrated by John Clapp, published by Harcourt in 2002, ISBN: 0152014543 , 36 pages, fiction

Summary: John walks out of his house surrounded by a lot of monarchs. They surround him and ask him to help them find some green space. He wants to help him but does not know how. The butterflies habitat had been destroyed and he flew with them to find a new place. He later studies butterflies in college because of this experience. John ends up trying to convince congress to pass a bill called, "The Butterfly Road." This bill will set aside migratory spaces for the butterflies. Later in life, John is surrounded by butterflies again but this time they cover him and he flies away forever.

Teaching points: Standard: ELA- W.2.7 – Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., read a number of books on a single topic to produce a report; record science observations). Science Standard NGSS- 2-LS4-1. Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats. Big five component: comprehension, six language art: writing. Students will discuss in groups and whole group about the habitat of butterflies. I want this book to focus on understanding their habitat and that students will write facts about where butterflies live. This will lead to making a diorama for a butterflies habitat.

Butterflies| Animals for Children, produced by All Things Animal TV, link: https://youtu.be/fUybrJmFv0c , Educational video

Summary: In this video by All Things Animal TV, the butterfly’s anatomy and life cycle is taught. The video covers the butterfly’s anatomy from the amount of wings they have to amount of legs. It finally goes over all four stages of a butterfly’s life which include, Egg, caterpillar, chrysalis, and finally a butterfly. The video is simple yet informative for children of all ages to comprehend.

Teaching Points: Standard: ELA- SL.2.5 – Create audio recordings of stories or poems; add drawings or other visual displays to stories or recounts of experiences when appropriate to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings. Science Standard NGSS- 2-LS4-1. Make observations of plants and animals to compare the diversity of life in different habitats. Big five component: comprehension, six language arts: listening. Students will watch this video to make connections to books. We will discuss mostly the body parts of the butterfly and why they have them. Students will draw a butterfly and label the parts of the body. Students will draw the life cycle of the butterfly by connecting arrows from the butterfly they drew. This will just be a visual representation for them to look back on.

Resources: All Things Animal TV. (2015, January 24). BUTTERFLIES | Animals for children. Kids videos. Kindergarten | Preschool learning. Retrieved from YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fUybrJmFv0c

Carle, E. (1994). The Very Hungry Caterpillar. City of Westminster, London: Putnam/Philomel.

Coville, B. (2002). The Prince of Butterflies. New York City, New York: Harcourt Children's Books.

Deluise, D. (1990). Charlie the Caterpillar. New York City, New York: Simon & Schuster Books For Young Readers.

Ehlert, L. (2001). Waiting for Wings. New York City, New York: Scholastics.

Falwell, C. (2003). Butterflies for Kiri. Gorham, Maine: Lee & Low Books.

Gibbons, G. (1989). Monarch Butterfly. New York City, New York: Holiday House.

Ho, C. (2016). Butterfly Butterfly. N/A: Phonic Monic Books.

Madison, A. (2007). Velma Gratch and the Way Cool Butterfly. New York City, New York: Schwartz & Wade.

Rockwell, A. (2002). Becoming Butterflies. New York City, New York: Walker & Company.

Created By
Jamie Melendez
Appreciate

Credits:

Created with images by GLady - "cocoon butterfly insect"

Report Abuse

If you feel that this video content violates the Adobe Terms of Use, you may report this content by filling out this quick form.

To report a Copyright Violation, please follow Section 17 in the Terms of Use.