Newcomers Class Part 2 Exploring our Vision Statement and What Makes Culture

Beit Hallel is a gathering of believers in our risen Lord and Savior, Yeshua the Messiah, who are intent upon nurturing a multi-generational, disciple-making community in which we all are encouraged and strengthened to live out the Shema by putting into practice the truths of the Bible, the inspired word of God.

Breaking down our vision statement into four parts:

1) Beit Hallel is a gathering of believers in our risen Lord and Savior, Yeshua the Messiah

2) who are intent upon nurturing a multi-generational, disciple-making community

3) in which we all are encouraged and strengthened to live out the Shema

4) by putting into practice the truths of the Bible, the inspired word of God.

Part 1: Beit Hallel is a gathering of believers in our risen Lord and Savior, Yeshua the Messiah – "Let us hold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for He who promised is faithful; and let us consider how to stimulate one another to love and good deeds, not forsaking our own assembling together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another; and all the more as you see the day drawing near." (Hebrews 10.23–25 NAS95)
Life to life relationships 1) How do we know that we share a common faith (language and meanings)? 2) Do we know value the same things? 3) Are we on the same page – do we do things the same? 4) What is our shared history, current story, and future vision?
The fruit of our fellowship, learning, living, and faith is rooted in Yeshua the Messiah being Lord and Savior of our lives. We all are part of His body. Connected to Him we bear good fruit.
Part 2: who are intent upon nurturing a multi-generational, disciple-making community
The LORD said, “Shall I hide from Abraham what I am about to do, since Abraham will surely become a great and mighty nation, and in him all the nations of the earth will be blessed? “For I have chosen him, so that he may command his children and his household after him to keep the way of the LORD by doing righteousness and justice, so that the LORD may bring upon Abraham what He has spoken about him.” (Genesis 18.17–19 NAS95)
“Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age.” (Matthew 28.19–20 NAS95)

Discipleship in the Messiah is about being good students and training others to be good students. A disciple is primarily a student not a teacher. The Messiah has all authority and we are instructed to be students of Him....making others students of Him. The skills to be a good student impact all areas of our lives – the way we talk to one another, the ethics we have in conducting business, the way we treat our parents, spouse, brothers and sisters, children, and even our enemies. What is the source of our instructions for life?

Therefore if there is any encouragement in Messiah, if there is any consolation of love, if there is any fellowship of the Spirit, if any affection and compassion, make my joy complete by being of the same mind, maintaining the same love, united in spirit, intent on one purpose. Do nothing from selfishness or empty conceit, but with humility of mind regard one another as more important than yourselves; do not merely look out for your own personal interests, but also for the interests of others. (Philippians 2.1–4 NAS95)
Part 3: in which we all are encouraged and strengthened to live out the Shema
“You shall love the LORD your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your might. “These words, which I am commanding you today, shall be on your heart. “You shall teach them diligently to your sons and shall talk of them when you sit in your house and when you walk by the way and when you lie down and when you rise up. (Deuteronomy 6.5–7 NAS95)
4) by putting into practice the truths of the Bible, the inspired word of God.
“Therefore everyone who hears these words of Mine and acts on them, may be compared to a wise man who built his house on the rock. “And the rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and slammed against that house; and yet it did not fall, for it had been founded on the rock. “Everyone who hears these words of Mine and does not act on them, will be like a foolish man who built his house on the sand. “The rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and slammed against that house; and it fell — and great was its fall.” (Matthew 7.24–27 NAS95)
All Scripture is inspired by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, for training in righteousness; so that the man of God may be adequate, equipped for every good work. (2 Timothy 3.16–17 NAS95)

Since we hold to the primacy of Scripture as God’s revelation to us of Himself and His way of salvation, we must also utilize an historical, grammatical hermeneutic.

This is because the author’s intended meaning is carried in the written language itself, which is a basic function of all human language.

Since the Bible is written in common, human languages, we must interpret it as we would any written text.

The idea that the language of the Bible contains hidden mysteries unlocked by interpreting ancient pictographic hieroglyphs is a hoax. No human language works that way.

Other fantastic claims of special interpretations fail because those who offer such interpretations are not intent on finding the original author’s meaning.

The modern and post-modern philosophies of “meaning,” promoting the idea that the author’s intended meaning is lost to the reader, are in line with post-modernism in general which seeks to do away with all boundary markers.

Our biblical worldview begins with God Who reveals Himself in truth and does so in a manner understandable to mankind, i.e., through human language.

The Bible is written in common human languages and should therefore be interpreted according to the rules which govern any and all literature.

This means that an historical, grammatical interpretation of the biblical text is the only method possible to derive the author’s meaning and therefore to properly understand the revelation God has given to us.

(Taken from: http://www.torahresource.com/apmf2016/Philippines_Conference_Handout_missing_page.pdf)

Cultural Artifacts

Cultural artifact is a term used in the social sciences, particularly anthropology, ethnology, and sociology for anything created by humans which gives information about the culture of its creator and users.

1) Tell us something about the way the world is

2) Tell us something about the way the world should be

3) Make some things possible

4) Make some things impossible or at least very difficult

5) Create building materials and tools for the next generation's artifacts

In what ways are the traditions of your family and the traditions of Beit Hallel cultural artifacts? We speak of "binding someone's conscience" as a standard for what we know God has revealed. Do we share this meaning, value, and way of doing things? What makes up a godly marriage, family, community? Who decides and what do we do when we disagree?

Created By
Gary Springer
Appreciate
Created with images by Robbie1 - "Waves on a calm lake" • donald judge - "1.5.16 Lichfield Mysteries 06 Abraham and Isaac 09" • donald judge - "1.5.16 Lichfield Mysteries 06 Abraham and Isaac 10" • NWABR - "2010 Student Fellows"

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