Gender Roles In The Elizabethan Era By: JAiden MAli

Gender in the Elizabethan Era was very different from other cultures around this time. Men were seen to be more important them women in the Elizabethan Era. The male was the head of the household and controlled the economic resources of the family and made all of the principal decisions. (Grendler 456) Women in the Elizabethan era generally only did household chores and tend to the kids.

Lady Macbeth. Fine Art. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/163_2965649/1/163_2965649/cite. Accessed 16 Mar 2017.

The women in the Elizabethan era did not have many jobs or responsibilities. At the time the husbands and men in a women's lives were supposed to "look after" the them. ("Society and Culture" 1) In addition to preserving their virginity, daughters were required to master skills they were later expected to perform as wives and household managers, most important were textile crafts: spinning, weaving, and embroidering. (Grendler 318) But, both the husband and wife were expected to work although she was normally engaged in labor that could be done at home. (Singman 30)

Woman writing, painting by the Master of the female half-figure, first half of 16th century. Photograph. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/126_538548/1/126_538548/cite. Accessed 16 Mar 2017.

Women in the Elizabethan era also did not have many rights. Women were not allowed to own or inherit property or a title other than royalty. Women were not allowed to participate in politics. Men were able to beat, rape, and lock away their wives. They also had full control of their children. (Olsen, encyclopedia)

QUEEN ELIZABETH I. - (1533-1603). Queen of England and Ireland, 1558-1603: colored English engraving, 1586.. Fine Art. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/140_1650257/1/140_1650257/cite. Accessed 16 Mar 2017.

Works Cited

  1. Medici, Anthony G. "Society and Culture in Shakespeare’s Day." The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare, by William Baker and Kenneth Womack, vol. 1, Facts on File, 2012, pp. 24-45. Facts On File Library of WorldLiterature. Gale Virtual Reference Library,
  2. Singman, Jeffrey L. “Daily Life in Elizabethan England.” Westport, Connecticut - London: Greenwood, 1995. Print. "Daily Life Through History".
  3. Grendler, Paul F. Encyclopedia of the Renaissance 5. New York: Scribner, 1999. Print.
  4. Olsen, Kirstin. All Things Shakespeare: An Encyclopedia of Shakespeare's World. Westport, Conn: Greenwood, 2002. Print.

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