Injury prevention Teaching plan

Of all the possible sources of harm that may affect the elderly, FALLS are among the most common & serious.

OBJECTIVE: Provide information so that older adults can make behavioral and environmental changes to improve their safety and prevent falls.

FACTS: More than ONE-THIRD of people aged 65 and older fall each year. Fall injuries are responsible for significant disability, loss of independence, and reduced quality of life.
Start PRE-TEST:
  • List some of the risk factors for falls?
  • Identify potential safety hazards in your home.
  • You should review side effects of medications with a doctor regularly. True or false?
  • Why is it important to consistently practice physical exercises?
YOU can do it! Here are some points to help your understanding of engaging in behaviors designed to reduce risk factors for falling & protect yourself from injury.

Who is at risk for falls?

  • age 65 and over
  • visual/hearing difficulties
  • presence of chronic diseases (hypertension, hypercholestermia, arthritis, etc.)
  • multiple medications that cause side effects (dizziness, drowsiness, confusion, or postural hypotension)
  • impaired physical mobility
  • impaired balance
  • history of falling
Do you know YOUR risks?
What can YOU do to prevent falls?

Take action!

1. Find a good balance & exercise program.

  • Incorporate preferred physical activities in your daily lives.
  • There are programs out there individualized for each person.
Find a program you like a take a friend!
As a result of aging, older adults have decreased muscle mass, decreased bone density, & slower gait. Consistent exercise is SO important to preventing falls and injury.
Find a program you like a take a friend!
Stay active and encourage others to as well!

2. Talk to your health care provider.

  • Ask for an assessment of your risk of falling
  • Share your history of falling

3. Review your medications with your doctor or pharmacist regularly.

Many medications cause something called orthostatic hypotension which is a form of low blood pressure that happens when you stand up from sitting or lying down.

  • Be careful when changing positions to prevent dizziness, light headedness, and falling.
  • Get out of bed slowly

4. Get your vision and hearing checked annually.

Your eyes & ears are key to keeping you on your feet!

5. Keep your home safe

  • Remove tripping hazards (rugs, clutter, etc.)
  • Increase diffuse lighting
  • Install grab bars in key areas

6. Talk to your friends and family to help you take steps to stay safe

Falls are not only a seniors' issue!
Falls are not only a seniors' issue!
Community resources:

Click the link below for resources that can help you in your community!

Start POST-TEST:
  • List some of the risk factors for falls.
  • Identify potential safety hazards in the home.
  • You should review side effects of medications with a doctor regularly, true or false?
  • Why is it important to consistently practice physical exercises?

References

Chan, D.K., Chan, T., Luk, J. (2015). Falls prevention in the elderly: translating evidence into practice. Hong Kong Medical Journal, Volume 21, 167-171. doi: 0.12809/hkmj144469. Retrieved from: http://www.hkmj.org/system/files/hkmj144469.pdf

Miller, P.A., Sinding, C., Griffith, L.E., & Shannon, H. S. (2016, February). Seniors’ narratives of asking (and not asking) for help after a fall: implications for indentity. Ageing and Society, Cambridge University, volume 36, 240-258. Doi: 10.1017/S0144686X14001123. Retrieved February 18, 2017 from http://search.proquest.com.proxy.libraries.uc.edu/docview/1754623166?pq-origsite=summon&accountid=2909.

Created By
Camelia Kiss
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