HAITI Emmanual HARDY

At 4:53 pm on January 12, 2010, an earthquake registering a 7.0 on the Richter scale struck the country of Haiti, a few miles outside the capital of Port-Au-Prince. This devastating natural disaster killed over 200,000 and left over 600,000 injured or homeless, struggling to find the basic resources needed for survival. The earthquake also drastically changed the political, economical and ecological landscapes of Haiti, causing the already fragile government to virtually collapse. The lack of leadership during the time of crisis led to the reliance on foreign aid for almost all needed resources. Tent camps sprung up all over the country for people to live in during their transient living state.
The 7.0-magnitude quake struck in the morning of Jan. 12, 2010, destroying landmarks such as the presidential palace and the Sacre Coeur Church in Port-au-Prince. With more than 220,000 people killed, the earthquake was one of the worst natural disasters of modern times.Haiti is among the poorest countries in the world. More than half of the population lives in crowded slums and up to sixty percent survives on less than $2 a day. It is also one of the nations most at risk of natural disasters. The before and after photos below serve as a stark reminder of the magnitude of the calamity that struck the country in 2010 and show how much, and how little, Haiti has changed since the quake.
Haiti was 145th of 169 countries in the UN Human Development Index, which is the lowest in the Western Hemisphere More than 70% of people in Haiti were living on less than per day 86% of people in Port au Prince were living in slum conditions - mostly tightly-packed, poorly-built, concrete buildings. 80% of education in Haiti was provided in often poor-quality private schools, the state system generally provided better education but provided far too few places Half of people in Port-au-Prince had no access to latrines and only one-third has access to tap water
It is not as if the earthquake in Haiti was a surprise to the world's seismologists. They had known for decades about the fault line that caused it, and some geologists, including Eric Calais of Purdue University and Paul Mann of the University of Texas, had warned as recently as 2008 that when the fault gave way, the result could be a quake of up to 7.2 magnitude.The U.S. Geological Survey says the fault probably caused a major earthquake in Jamaica in 1907, and written descriptions suggest it caused powerful quakes in 1860, 1770, 1761, 1751, 1684, 1673, and 1618.
Haiti is situated in North America. Located in the Western Hemisphere, the sovereign state is spread over an area of 27,750 square kilometers. The nation is situated on the island of Hispaniola in Caribbean's Greater Antilles archipelago. Haiti is the third largest country in the Caribbean followed by Cuba and the Dominican Republic. To the east, the Dominican Republic borders Haiti. Cuba is located some 80-km west of the northern Peninsula of Haiti, while Jamaica is some 193-km west of the southern Peninsula. The nation has a coastline of 1,771 km. Haiti mostly has a rough and mountainous terrain. The Caribbean Sea at 0 m is the lowest point of the country, while Chaine de la Selle at 2,680 m is the highest point.
Haiti was 145th of 169 countries in the UN Human Development Index, which is the lowest in the Western Hemisphere More than 70% of people in Haiti were living on less than per day 86% of people in Port au Prince were living in slum conditions - mostly tightly-packed, poorly-built, concrete buildings. 80% of education in Haiti was provided in often poor-quality private schools, the state system generally provided better education but provided far too few places Half of people in Port-au-Prince had no access to latrines and only one-third has access to tap water.

IMPACT OF THE EARTHQUAKE

7.0 Magnitude Quake struck near Port au Prince 3,500,000 people were affected by the quake 220,000 people estimated to have died 300,000+ people were injured Over 188,383 houses were badly damaged and 105,000 were destroyed by the earthquake (293,383 in total), 1.5m people became homeless After the quake there were 19 million cubic metres of rubble and debris in Port au Prince – enough to fill a line of shipping containers stretching end to end from London to Beirut. 4,000 schools were damaged or destroyed 25% of civil servants in Port au Prince died 60% of Government and administrative buildings, 80% of schools in Port-au-Prince and 60% of schools in the South and West Departments were destroyed or damaged Over 600,000 people left their home area in Port-au-Prince and mostly stayed with host families At its peak, one and a half million people were living in camps including over 100,000 at critical risk from storms and flooding Unrelated to the earthquake but causing aid response challenges was the outbreak of cholera in October 2010. By July 2011 5,899 had died as a result of the outbreak, and 216,000 were infected

SOURCES

http://www.mapsofworld.com/haiti/haiti-location-map.html http://www.dec.org.uk/articles/haiti-earthquake-facts-and-figures

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8dEEGxtCccc

Name Emmanual Hardy 1/22/2017

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Emmanual Hardy
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Created with images by IDVMedia - "haiti 035" • newbeatphoto - "haiti_postearthquake02" • Podknox - "Seismology of Haiti Earthquake" • newbeatphoto - "haiti_postearthquake14"

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