World War 2 NazI/Jewish

The Holocaust (Shoah) was a unique event in 20th century history. It evolved slowly between 1933 and 1945. It began with discrimination; then the Jews were separated from their communities and persecuted; and finally they were treated as less than human beings and murdered. During the Second World War the Nazis sought to murder the entire Jewish population of Europe and to destroy its culture. In 1941-1939 there were about 11 million Jews living in Europe; by May 1945 the Nazis had kill six million of them. One-and-a-half million of these were children.
Hitler was appointed Chancellor on 30 January 1933. Immediately, the SA stepped up their campaign of violence and terror against the communists. They did this in order to increase their power and to reduce opposition. Across Germany the local police and SA and SS rounded up many thousands of communists, socialists, church leaders and anyone else who might criticise the Nazis. As prisoners were physically concentrated in one place the Nazis called on these first camps concentration camps. Over the next 12 years, as they invaded and occupied lands all over Europe, the Nazis would build over 20,000 camps of various kinds. These included concentration camps, transit camps, forced labour or work camps and death camps. This section will consider the different types of camps, the people that ran them and, more importantly, how these camps affected the millions of people who were prisoners within them.
On coming to power during 1933 the Nazis began to establish a network of camps. These were initially concentration camps due to the fact that they were used to concentrate enemies and certain groups of people in one place. However, very soon the Nazi leadership began to develop a systematic and centrally controlled system of camps. Later, as the Nazi regime imposed their influence over countries they occupied, they developed a different types of camps. These were concentration camps, transit camps, forced-labour or work camps and extermination camps.
What are camps? Hitler was appointed Chancellor on 30 January 1933. Immediately, the SA stepped up their campaign of violence and terror against the communists. They did this in order to increase their power and to reduce opposition. Hermann Goering, a leading Nazi, was appointed head of the police in Bavaria. Across Germany the local police and SA and SS rounded up many thousands of communists, socialists, church leaders and anyone else who might criticise the Nazis. These prisoners were held in local prisons and police stations. There were so many prisoners that makeshift buildings were converted to house them. This system did not work – it was inefficient and not centrally run. The Nazis needed a new solution. They realised that they would have to establish large, purpose-built camps in order to hold these prisoners. As prisoners were physically concentrated in one place, the Nazis called these first camps 'concentration camps'. Over the next 12 years, as they invaded and occupied lands all over Europe, the Nazis would build over 20,000 camps of various kinds. These included concentration camps, transit camps, forced labour or work camps and death camps.
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"What were the camps?" Concentration Camps - Key Stage 3 - The Holocaust Explained. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 Feb. 2017.

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