Good Life Tour of the Harn Camya Robinson

3/14/17. Camya Robinson in front of the Harn Museum of Art. Photo credit to Camya Robinson.

Medium of the Art

3/14/17. Camya Robinson in front of Traces by Viye Diba. Photo credit to Camya Robinson.

In this piece of art, the artist uses mixed media such as woven cloth, canvas, and discarded material. It has earthy tones in it and the materials are very textured. Seeing it in person helped me better observe the texture of the work and how rough it looked. There were several patches within the piece that were distressed by the artist. I could see how this represented the harsh times during the Rwanda genocide. This artwork was simple, yet complex, which is what stood out to me. It communicated to me the hurt, pain, and chaos during that time. I felt somber and intense sorrow thinking about the people that had to experience such a time.

Diba, Viye. Traces. 2007. Mixed Media. Harn Museum of Art, Florida. Photo credit to Camya Robinson

Design of the Museum

3/14/17. Camya Robinson in front of the Asian Rock Garden designed by Hoichi Korisu. Photo credit to Camya Robinson.

One particular wing in the museum that appealed to me was the Asian rock garden. It was satisfying to see the neat, fluid lines left in the rocks. Also, the fact that is was outdoors made it a good place to just sit and enjoy the air. There was a calming atmosphere about it. I found myself sitting there and just observing my surroundings and relaxing in the sun. I liked the juxtaposition of the natural rocks and plants with the handmade patterns, it was interesting. I can appreciate the effort that it took to create this exhibit.

Korisu, Hoichi. Asian Rock Garden. n.d. Harn Museum of Art, Florida. Photo credit to Camya Robinson

Art and Core Values

3/14/17. Camya Robinson in front of Islandia, Goddess of Healing Waters by Audrey Flack. Photo credit to Camya Robinson.

One of my core values is equality. This particular artwork focuses on this value. It is a statue of the goddess Islandia. She is colorful and extravagant and gives off an air of power. She is actually the goddess of healing waters. I think this aspect is what stood out to me the most because it represented the healing of social issues such as inequality. There is much inequality in our society in all forms. It can get frustrating at times, but this work reminds me that there is still hope. I feel hopeful when looking at this work and that the issues in our society will eventually be resolved. I feel as though equality is achievable and not just a hopeless goal.

Flack, Audrey. Islandia, Goddess of Healing Waters. 1998. Polychrome and gilded plaster. Harn Museum of Art, Florida. Photo credit to Camya Robinson

Art and the Good Life

3/14/17. Camya Robinson in front of Women's Wedding Ensemble (asherab nabuak) by the Amazigh People.

This art piece is the traditional dress that the Siwa Oasis women would wear during their wedding ceremony. It evokes the theme of celebrating the good life. Marriage is a time of celebrating the union of two people who love each other. This clothing is intricate and colorful and attracts attention to the bride during this important occasion. It helps me appreciate the different ways in which other cultures celebrate certain events. In the Siwa Oasis community, the wedding ceremony lasts for seven days. Each day she wears a new outfit. This piece emphasizes how important clothing can be to a celebration.

Amazigh People. Women's Wedding Ensemble (asherab nabuak). Late 20th century. Synthetic cloth, silk, cotton, buttons. Harn Museum of Art, Florida. Photo credit to Camya Robinson

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