Robert Capa Devin Lambert B1

Capa originally wanted to be a writer; however, he found work in photography in Berlin and grew to love the art. He went to Deutsche Hochschule für Politik. Capa's first published photograph was of Leon Trotsky making a speech in Copenhagen on "The Meaning of the Russian Revolution" in 1932.

Robert Capa mostly did war photography and his work ranged from the Spanish Civil War all till his death during the Vietnam War. He died by stepping on a landmine. In 1947, Capa founded the cooperative venture Magnum Photos in Paris with Henri Cartier-Bresson, William Vandivert, David Seymour, and George Rodger. It was a cooperative agency to manage work for and by freelance photographers, and developed a reputation for the excellence of its photo-journalists. In 1952, he became the president.

He was known as the greatest war photographer in the world. He was also awarded the medal of Freedom. He also earned the World Press Photo Award for General News.

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