Elizabethan Era Austin Hawley

English coins
armor
Clothing style
bow
gun
pot pies - common to both classes
upper class food

Notecards

Elizabethan Age laws

Thesis: The Elizabethan Era was a warring time of imperialistic rule as shown through politics, laws and weaponry.

Source:

Bumgardner, Jake. "Elizabethan Age." <i>World Book Advanced</i>. World Book, 2016. Web. 7 Dec. 2016.

Quote:

By law, such action could be regarded as treason. In 1587, Elizabeth executed her cousin Mary Stuart , the former Catholic queen of Scotland . Mary had been the willing focus of several Catholic plots against Elizabeth(Bumgardner)

My Ideas:

Rulers ruled with an iron grip.They some time exucted for fun.

History:

Created: 12/13/2016 08:02 AM

Elizabethan Era

Source:

Bumgardner, Jake. "Elizabethan Age." <i>World Book Advanced</i>. World Book, 2016. Web. 7 Dec. 2016.

Quote:

Elizabethan Age, or Elizabethan Era, was a period of English history during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I , from 1558 to 1603. Elizabeth was a strong ruler who gained the loyalty and admiration of her subjects. The Elizabethan Age is sometimes called the Golden Age , because it was a time of great achievement in England (Bumgardner).

My Ideas:

The Queen Elizabeth ruled Four-Hundred years ago and her legacy still live to this day

History:

Created: 12/07/2016 02:52 PM

Elizabethan Era Polotics

Source:

Bumgardner, Jake. "Elizabethan Age." <i>World Book Advanced</i>. World Book, 2016. Web. 7 Dec. 2016.

Quote:

ot everyone prospered during the Elizabethan Age. Strict rules regulated clothing, land ownership, marriage, and religion. In the latter half of Elizabeth’s reign, she actively persecuted Catholics. Some radical forms of Protestantism also were not tolerated. A number of people were executed for activity opposing the established church. By law, such action could be regarded as treason (Bumgardner).

My Ideas:

The rulers back then were very sricted. They controlled marrage and religion

History:

Created: 12/15/2016 09:22 AM

religion

Quote:

This essay evaluates Patrick Collinson's Ford Lectures at Oxford in 1979, which were published in revised form as The Religion of Protestants in 1982. It examines his harmonious vision of the 'institutional equilibrium' of the Elizabethan and Jacobean Church, alongside its absorption of the values of moderate puritanism and its capacity to accommodate the forms of voluntary religion with which the 'godly' supplemented prayer book worship. It assesses the influence of Reformation and early Stuart revisionism on Collinson's thinking and underlines his distaste for William Laud, whom he saw as the architect of the demise of the Grindalian tradition which he revered. It also probes the unreconciled tension between Collinson's insistence on the consensual character of puritanism and his awareness of the latent potential for principled disobedience inherent with in it. The essay concludes with some remarks on Collinson's historical method( Walsham, );.

History:

Created: 12/15/2016 10:13 AM

The Change in Armor

Source:

Smith, Robert Powell. "Armor." <i>World Book Advanced</i>. World Book, 2016. Web. 7 Dec. 2016

Quote:

Guns changed the ways of waging war and therefore the protection needed. Armor, made ever thicker and heavier to be bulletproof, became too heavy to wear. By the mid-1600's, only helmets and breastplates continued to be used (Smith).

My Ideas:

This is the beginning of the modern war we know. Troops can't were 200lb armor so they abandoned it

History:

Created: 12/07/2016 03:09 PM

war

Source:

"Death Of Sir Richard Grenville." <i>History Today</i> 66.9 (2016): 9. <i>History Reference Center</i>. Web. 15 Dec. 2016.

Quote:

The article profiles Sir Richard Grenville, an English naval man. Topics discussed include Grenville as captain of the "revenge," a galleon which was Francis Drake's flagship against the Spanish Armada, he and his men fought off and damaged one Spanish warship and he died from injuries at the age of 49 on September 2, 1591. ( History Today , Sep2016, Vol. 66 Issue 9, p9 )

My Ideas:

the british were at war at the time . this might of had so ripples in the world to day.

History:

Created: 12/15/2016 10:24 AM

Works Cited

Bumgardner, Jake. “Elizabethan Age.” World Book Advanced. World Book, 2016. Web. 7 Dec. 2016.

“Death Of Sir Richard Grenville.” History Today 66.9 (2016): 9. History Reference Center. Web. 15 Dec. 2016.

Smith, Robert Powell. “Armor.” World Book Advanced. World Book, 2016. Web. 7 Dec. 2016

Credits:

Created with images by Provenance Online Project - "Engraving of Queen Elizabeth I, with chronogram recording the year of her death (1603)"

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