Putting an End to Segregation By: Ilayda Guneren

"I would like to be remembered as a person who wanted to be free... so other people would be also free" - Rosa Parks

Segregation was nullified by activists such as Martin Luther King Jr and Rosa Parks, social groups like the NAACP, and the involvement of African Americans in society.

Overview on Segregation

  • Lasted roughly from 1896 to 1964
  • Blacks were separated from whites
  • Whites were seen as the superior race

Martin Luther King JR

  • Was an activist during this time period
  • He contributed to help end segregation because of his speeches
  • His most famous speech was called "I Have a Dream" and about 250,000 people attended it
  • But his ideas about segregation were spread all across America
  • He also led some boycotts and protests
  • Received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964

Rosa Parks

  • Another activist during this time period
  • Arrested in the December of 1955 for refusing to surrender her bus seat to a white man
  • Broke the city law
  • Even though she was arrested, she motivated many people such as a group of women who went on a strike against city buses

NAACP

  • Founded in 1909
  • Well known activists were a part of this organization
  • Led to the passing of three Civil Rights Acts
  • Members were targeted because of rapid growth
  • Banned segregation in schools (1954)
  • Voting Rights Act of 1965

Blacks and Society

  • Excluded from politics
  • Literacy test and Grandfather Clause
  • Less education
  • Roosevelt appointed blacks to high offices
  • Eleanor Roosevelt resigned from the Daughter of American Revolution

Credits:

Created with images by Seattle Municipal Archives - "Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day march, 2003" • skeeze - "martin luther king jr i have a"

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