Fairy Tales of the World Iceland

Geography

Location

Iceland is the westernmost country of Europe. It is an island between the Greenland Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean. Located in the Arctic Region, Iceland is northwest of the United Kingdom.

Climate

Despite it's name Iceland, the country has a fairly mild climate. It has long and mild winters, and cool and short summers. Iceland’s climate is moderated by the Gulf Stream. Even though its northernmost points almost touch the Arctic Circle, Iceland is much warmer than expected.

Double Rainbow

Physical Characteristics

Iceland is mainly a central volcanic plateau interspersed with mountain peaks and icefields. It has a rugged coastline indented by bays. Iceland is full of glaciers, with the Vatnajökull being the largest glacier in Europe. In fact, Iceland has more land covered by glaciers than all of continental Europe! It also has many active volcanoes. Glacier ice and cooled lava make up one tenth of Iceland’s area. It also has many waterfalls and geysers.

Iceland's Coast
Glacier Lagoon
Strokkur Geyser

Population

As of July 2015, Iceland’s population is 331, 918. 94% of the people are descendants of the Norse and Celts. The other 6% are foreigners.

Blue Lagoon Geothermal Spa

Culture

Iceland Airwaves Festival

Customs & Traditions

Iceland’s character is shown in its homogeneity and its isolation, and its people take care to preserve their traditions. Iceland has been known for its ancestral crafts, such as knitwear. The largest festival is Independence Day, celebrating the country’s independence in 1944.

Religions

Iceland’s official religion is Lutheran. 9 out of 10 people belong to the Evangelical Lutheran Church of Iceland. But, there is still freedom of religion.

Hallgrimskirkja Church

Languages

Iceland’s official language is Icelandic, which is from Old Norse. Many Icelanders also speak English, German, and other Nordic languages.

This Icelandic saga was written in Old Norse.

Food

Icelandic cuisine is centered around it’s fishing industry. Icelanders eat shark, whale, seal, and salmon, as well as lamb, ram, and sheep. The skyr, made of cultured skim milk, is a unique Icelandic dessert. Coffee is common, but people also drink brennivín, a distinctive Icelandic liquor made from potatoes.

Fish for Dinner!

"The Witch in the Stone Boat"

Compiled by: Andrew Lang

Synopsis

A Queen is held hostage, while the palace holds the King and an evil witch acting in the Queen's place.

Typical Characteristics

Like many fairy tales, "The Witch in the Stone Boat" has a special beginning:

[t]here were once a King and a Queen (Lang).

This fairy tale has several good characters, but the main one is King Sigurd, the protagonist. King Sigurd

saw at once that it was his own Queen, and immediately [cut] the iron chain that was fastened to the [Queen's] belt (Lang).

"The Witch in the Stone Boat" has two evil characters, but the main one is the witch. The witch cast a spell on the Queen, so that she could be held hostage in the Underworld.

Similar to several fairy tales, this one does contain royalty. It is represented with the castle, the King, and the Queen.

Another motif used in "The Witch in the Stone Boat" was the use of magic. The evil witch cast a spell on the Queen, so that she does not

slacken [her] course until [she] come[s] to [the witch's] brother in the Underworld (Lang).

The problem in this fairy tale is that the Queen is held hostage, and the witch is trying to replace her. The King and Queen solved the problem by working together. The Queen managed to enter the palace, and the King released the Queen from the chain that connected her to the Underworld.

A common motif in many fairy tales is when things often happen in 3s. In this story, the Queen told the three-headed giant

that she would consent [to marriage] if he would allow her to visit her son on earth three days on end (Lang).

Connection to Iceland

"The Witch in the Stone Boat" contains a cultural clue that indicates its Icelandic origin. The name Sigurd comes from Norse, which makes up the majority of the Icelandic population. Sigurd was a legendary hero in Norse mythology.

Created By
S Reddy
Appreciate

Credits:

Created with images by Moyan_Brenn - "Iceland" samurai_dave - "IMG_5854" James Seith Photography - "Iceland Winter photos, 2015" smaus - "strokkur geyser iceland" WorldIslandInfo.com - "Hallgrimskirkja" moohaha - "Butter-fried Halibut" Unsplash - "sailing boat ocean open water" enelene - "swallow's nest crimea palace" steveczajka - "Once upon a time" quinet - "Good King Wenceslas" ColdSmiling - "noble castle hofburg imperial palace" Pexels - "mathematics colorful game" peachesh - "three" Iceland. Photography. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Web. 31 Mar 2016. Map of Iceland. Illustration. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Web. 31 Mar 2016. People relaxing in Blue Lagoon geothermal spa, Svartsengi Geothermal Power Station in the distance, Grindavik, Reykjanes Peninsula, Iceland, Polar Regions. Photography. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Web. 1 Apr 2016. Iceland Airwaves Festival - Day Four. Photography. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Web. 2 Apr 2016. Illustration from the collection of Icelandic sagas, the Flateyjarbok.This illumination from the saga of Olaf Tryggvason depicts some of his legendary exploits - the killing of a wild boar and a sea-ogress. Date/Period:14th C Culture: Country:Illustration from the collection of Icelandic sagas, the Flateyjarbok.This illumination from the saga of Olaf Tryggvason depicts some of his legendary exploits - the killing of a wild boar and a sea-ogress.. Photography. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Web. 2 Apr 2016. Ford, Henry J. "File:Yellow Fairy Book-The Witch in the Stone Boat1.jpg." WIkimedia Commons. 21 Dec. 2013. Web. 2 Apr. 2016. Witches meeting and performing spell. Photograph. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Web. 2 Apr 2016. Sigurd. Photograph. Encyclopædia Britannica ImageQuest. Web. 2 Apr 2016. Lang, Andrew. "The Witch in the Stone Boat." The Yellow Fairy Book. Lit2Go Edition. 1894. Web. April 02, 2016. Gall, Timothy L., and Jeneen M. Hobby. Worldmark Encyclopedia of the Nations. 12th ed. Detroit, MI: Thomson Gale, 2007. Print. "Iceland." Britannica School. Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 2016. Web. 30 Mar. 2016. "Europe :: Iceland." Central Intelligence Agency. Central Intelligence Agency, 2016. Web. 30 Mar. 2016.

Report Abuse

If you feel that this video content violates the Adobe Terms of Use, you may report this content by filling out this quick form.

To report a Copyright Violation, please follow Section 17 in the Terms of Use.