To Kill a MockingBird Essay By: Manit Patel

Injustice graffiti

How many ways does injustice apply to current day life? Whether in the classroom when students are reading a book that deals with injustice, or when it happens outside of the classroom such as the African-American rights movement or Women’s Rights movement, whether we like it or not, injustice is quite prevalent in current day society. In an online article about the March on Washington, it is shown how many hurdles African-Americans had to overcome in order to actually have a march on Washington. Also, in the online editorial on the New York Times’s website, it is exhibited that many times the Women’s March on Washington that took place wouldn’t have happened for a number of reasons. In To Kill a Mockingbird a man is wrongfully incriminated of rape because of the color of his skin. All three of the text’s have something in common, injustice is prevalent in all of them.

Dr. Martin Luther King Junior giving his famous "I Have a Dream Speech", standing on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28th, 1963
Atticus Finch and Tom Robinson at the Trial in to Kill a Mockingbird

Both the March on Washington and the trial in To Kill a Mockingbird are similar in a way, they both men leading it with full passion and effort, even though the men knew the consequences would be dire. Atticus Finch and Martin Luther King Jr. are men who fought for what they believed was right. Atticus Finch said,” You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view … until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.” This quote means that Atticus understood that there are many points of view to one incident and you can’t really understand them or even realize what the person is experiencing without being that person. In the online article about the March on Washington1, it is said that,”The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King’s soaring address climaxed the day; through his eloquence, the phrase “I Have a Dream” became an expression of the highest aspirations of the civil rights movement.” This quote from the article shows that Dr. Martin Luther King was able to understand the other point of view in the civil rights movement. That point of view is the white people’s point of view and Dr. King understood that the white’s were used to a certain point of view and they weren’t quite willing yet to change their opinion on that point of view. These two examples show that both of the men leading charges on their own respective fronts, Atticus Finch, and Dr. Martin Luther King, understood that there is always an opposite side and you won’t be able to understand their point of view unless you are them, or are in their “shoes”.

A little girl at the Women's March in Washington D.C.
Scout Finch, in To Kill a Mockingbird

Another way that To Kill a Mockingbird relates to a civil rights event through injustice is the Women’s March. The two are related in a way that shows how unjustly women were treated in the time period of To Kill a Mockingbird and a little bit nowadays as a part of the Women’s March. The Women’s March was a stand against injustice against women, which was supporting the idea that women can do whatever they want to do provided it's within the law. An example of this is when, at the Women’s March, actress Ashley Judd said ,”They “ain’t for grabbing,” she said. “They are for birthing new generations of filthy, vulgar, nasty, proud, Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, Sikh, you name it, for new generations of nasty women.” In To Kill a Mockingbird, Scout is told that she needs to act like a women more than a boy. An example of this is when Jem says,"Scout, I'm tellin' you for the last time, shut your trap or go home—I declare to the Lord you're gettin' more like a girl every day!" With that, I had no option but to join them. Back then, this means that she has to be a stereotypical women, which was wearing dresses, being a housewife, cooking for the family, and staying inside and not doing anything. Scout does not want to be a typical woman, she doesn’t want to wear dresses, and she doesn’t want to be like Miss Maudie, Scout would rather be like Jem, Jem gets freedom and can do as he pleases just because he is a boy. The common theme in both of these instances is that women are being told that they have to be a certain thing, and the women are taking a stand and saying that they can do whatever they want and can be there own person, without other people telling the what they should be.

In conclusion, the Women’s March, the March on Washington, and To Kill a Mockingbird, are all related in good ways and bad ways. A very prevalent theme in all of these three examples injustice. People are treated wrongly and unjustly because of the color of their skin, or whether or not they are male or female. In To Kill a Mockingbird, an innocent man is put in jail because of the color of his skin, and a girl is told to stray off of her dreams because she is a woman. In the March on Washington, African-Americans are told they have to eat at separate places or go to a blacks only place because of the color of their skin. In the Women’s March, women are told they can’t get the same jobs or same pay as men, just because they are women. Injustice surrounds us and is prevalent in our lives today, think of all the injustice takes place, the only person who can help make a change and stop this horrid, everyday theme in our lives is the person you see when you look in the mirror.

How many ways does injustice apply to current day life? Whether in the classroom when students are reading a book that deals with injustice, or when it happens outside of the classroom such as the African-American rights movement or Women’s Rights movement, whether we like it or not, injustice is quite prevalent in current day society. In an online article about the March on Washington, it is shown how many hurdles African-Americans had to overcome in order to actually have a march on Washington. Also, in the online editorial on the New York Times’s website, it is exhibited that many times the Women’s March on Washington that took place wouldn’t have happened for a number of reasons. In To Kill a Mockingbird a man is wrongfully incriminated of rape because of the color of his skin. All three of the text’s have something in common, injustice is prevalent in all of them.

Both the March on Washington and the trial in To Kill a Mockingbird are similar in a way, they both men leading it with full passion and effort, even though the men knew the consequences would be dire. Atticus Finch and Martin Luther King Jr. are men who fought for what they believed was right. Atticus Finch said,” You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view … until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.” This quote means that Atticus understood that there are many points of view to one incident and you can’t really understand them or even realize what the person is experiencing without being that person. In the online article about the March on Washington1, it is said that,”The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King’s soaring address climaxed the day; through his eloquence, the phrase “I Have a Dream” became an expression of the highest aspirations of the civil rights movement.” This quote from the article shows that Dr. Martin Luther King was able to understand the other point of view in the civil rights movement. That point of view is the white people’s point of view and Dr. King understood that the white’s were used to a certain point of view and they weren’t quite willing yet to change their opinion on that point of view. These two examples show that both of the men leading charges on their own respective fronts, Atticus Finch, and Dr. Martin Luther King, understood that there is always an opposite side and you won’t be able to understand their point of view unless you are them, or are in their “shoes”.

Another way that To Kill a Mockingbird relates to a civil rights event through injustice is the Women’s March. The two are related in a way that shows how unjustly women were treated in the time period of To Kill a Mockingbird and a little bit nowadays as a part of the Women’s March. The Women’s March was a stand against injustice against women, which was supporting the idea that women can do whatever they want to do provided it's within the law. An example of this is when, at the Women’s March, actress Ashley Judd said ,”They “ain’t for grabbing,” she said. “They are for birthing new generations of filthy, vulgar, nasty, proud, Christian, Muslim, Buddhist, Sikh, you name it, for new generations of nasty women.” In To Kill a Mockingbird, Scout is told that she needs to act like a women more than a boy. An example of this is when Jem says,"Scout, I'm tellin' you for the last time, shut your trap or go home—I declare to the Lord you're gettin' more like a girl every day!" With that, I had no option but to join them. Back then, this means that she has to be a stereotypical women, which was wearing dresses, being a housewife, cooking for the family, and staying inside and not doing anything. Scout does not want to be a typical woman, she doesn’t want to wear dresses, and she doesn’t want to be like Miss Maudie, Scout would rather be like Jem, Jem gets freedom and can do as he pleases just because he is a boy. The common theme in both of these instances is that women are being told that they have to be a certain thing, and the women are taking a stand and saying that they can do whatever they want and can be there own person, without other people telling the what they should be.

In conclusion, the Women’s March, the March on Washington, and To Kill a Mockingbird, are all related in good ways and bad ways. A very prevalent theme in all of these three examples injustice. People are treated wrongly and unjustly because of the color of their skin, or whether or not they are male or female. In To Kill a Mockingbird, an innocent man is put in jail because of the color of his skin, and a girl is told to stray off of her dreams because she is a woman. In the March on Washington, African-Americans are told they have to eat at separate places or go to a blacks only place because of the color of their skin. In the Women’s March, women are told they can’t get the same jobs or same pay as men, just because they are women. Injustice surrounds us and is prevalent in our lives today, think of all the injustice takes place, the only person who can help make a change and stop this horrid, everyday theme in our lives is the person you see when you look in the mirror.

Alcindor, Anemona Hartocollis and Yamiche. "Women's March Highlights as Huge Crowds Protest Trump: 'We're Not Going Away'." The New York Times. The New York Times, 21 Jan. 2017. Web. 07 Apr. 2017.

Lee, HarperCollins. To Kill a Mockingbird. New York: Harper, 1988. Print.

History.com Staff. "March on Washington." History.com. A&E Television Networks, 2009. Web. 07 Apr. 2017.

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Created with images by Sew Technicolor - "To Kill a Mockingbird 4" • KylaBorg - "Injustice anywhere..." • satomiichimura - "MLK- I Have a Dream" • carlyhag - "Boston Women's March"

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