Mustard Gas Max Christiansen

Mustard Gas was first introduced when the Germans brought it to WWI in 1917. The Germans had been trying to create a version of chemical warfare since 1915. And their very fist attempt in battle was in the battle of Ypres. But once they created mustard gas and tested it, people were never in such fear including the Germans

Mustard gas was on of the deadliest weapons in WWI. Mustard gas is created using a unique combination of sulfides, and the reaction is created by ethylene and sulfur. It was nearly nearly undetectable except for the color. Yes you could smell it, but when you would take in a lot of doses, like the solders did, it went undetected in terms of smell. Like when you smell you grandparents house for a day, you get used to it. When mustard gas sunk it's way into the soil, it remained active for several weeks. Which made it a very big problem for solders moving forward of backward from the trenches. One of it's most dangerous attributes was that it was heavy enough to sink into the trenches. Which made it a huge problem with people going to sleep. Another dangerous attribute to mustard gas was that it would penetrate filters and gas mask housing, which made it almost impossible to stop it from effecting you. And because chemical suits hadn't been created, it had the whole body to attack.

Mustard gas and other gases, I think, was just the Germans trying to revolutionize the war. They didn't have to fire bullets or use artillery, they just had to throw these over into enemy trenches. And personally I think they were trying to minimize the amount of solders that they would have die in battle, because there were thousands upon millions of people dying on both sides. And in a way, I think that the Germans revolutionized war for the next hundred years.

The Germans had created Mustard gas, but it does not have a huge impact on us today. Now a days we have extremely complex gases that are made to stun you, blind you, or even blister you. But all of these gases were inspired by mustard gas. Even though mustard gas is not allowed to be used anymore, we have created more types of chemical warfare because of it. It showed us what it could do to people, such as detain them or disarm them. And we have made gases to do those exact things.

One example of chemical warfare is Syria. Syria is going through a civil war right now and the government is being accused right now of dropping chemical weapons on the towns of Talmenes in 2014. And in 2013 they were accused of dropping chemical weapons in the suburbs of Aleppo. And these reports were not confirmed until it was confirmed by the United Nations earlier this year. And another example is Saddam Hussein's attack the Town of Halabja in northern Iraq. He used deadly nerve agents and mustard gas bombs to attack the town. And then they were attacked again 28 years later.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Use_of_chemical_weapons_in_the_Syrian_civil_war

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2016/03/remembering-halabja-chemical-attack-160316061221074.html

https://www.thebalance.com/chemical-weapons-controversial-and-deadly-3345061

http://science.howstuffworks.com/mustard-gas2.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_weapons_in_World_War_I

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemical_weapons_in_World_War_I

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