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All Night Long: Together, Sex and Meth Heighten the Likelihood of Addiction

Grant C. Hill

Adam and Kevin hop into a raging college house party. Drinks are flowing, music is blasting and lights are flashing. The entrance hallway was crowded and people were pressed together in the haze.

Adam turned to find himself face-to-face with a girl from his neuropsychopharmocology class who he had a crush on. He thought she was cute and a little quirky, especially given how much she knew about drugs.

Adam blushed, surprised to be pressed against his crush. She noticed him flustered, “I know you! You’re in Dr. Kuiper’s class, yeah? I’m Michaela.”

“I’m Adam!”, noticing Michaela’s cup was empty, “Want a refill?”

Michaela agreed. The three of them shouldered their way to the kitchen. As Adam was pouring shots, Michaela pulled out a baggy of orange-oval pills. Noticing Adam’s surprise at the pills, Michaela quipped, “Don’t bug out! It’s just something to kick the night up a notch. Don’t believe me? Try one! You two don’t look like NARCs”. Before Adam could think twice, they were throwing back the pills with their rum shots. “What’s in that?” Adam asked Michaela. “Don’t worry, it’s not ecstasy. It’s only my Adderall. I have a prescription.” Michaela cooed.

Making their way to the dance floor, the night took an ecstatic turn. Beads of sweat ran down Adam’s face, slipping onto Michaela’s neck as they danced close in the party. Michaela leaned in, “let’s go somewhere a little more private,” her lips brushing Adam’s ear. The two left the crowd, finding themselves intertwined in an upstairs bedroom, clothes elsewhere.

Adam had other things on his mind, but he should have been thinking about earlier that week when Dr. Kuiper’s voice boomed eerily in lecture, “…in my animal study, I found that methamphetamine and sex experienced together led to greater acquisition of addiction-like symptoms and there is nothing to say this isn’t the case with other drugs. So, think twice before fooling around on your friend’s Adderall prescription. It’s amphetamine, not coffee.”*

“Don’t worry, it’s not ecstasy. It’s only my Adderall. I have a prescription.”

After that blissful night, Michaela and Adam grew closer. They’d study together for neuropsychopharm—with some chemical assistance. Soon, the two were going out together, always opening the night with orange pills and closing it by steaming up the windows, night-after-night.

One day Michaela noticed that pills were missing from her prescription. She didn’t want to believe it, but Adam was the only one who knew where she kept the bottle.

Michaela confronted Adam at his dorm room, finding him mid-process of crushing up a pill on his notebook in the middle of the day. “You’ve been stealing my meds? You need to get your shit together!” She yelled, storming off.

“…methamphetamine and sex experienced together led to greater acquisition of addiction-like symptoms...”

Adam turned back into his room, shaken. “What’s her problem? She’s treating me like an addict! What’s a couple pills? Nothing! I don’t have a problem, but why isn’t she struggling like me?” Suddenly Adam thought back to their first encounter months before, “Why was the sex so great with Michaela? Could it have been the drugs? Was that where this started?”

“…So, think twice before fooling around on your friend’s Adderall prescription. It’s amphetamine, not coffee.”

Credits:

http://i.imgur.com/HifwA.jpg https://www.edgehill.ac.uk/news/files/2014/06/autism-conference-183-of-402-1024x683.jpg https://farm4.static.flickr.com/3228/5765080732_b5fbc557b9_b.jpg https://i.pinimg.com/originals/b6/b1/07/b6b107e984b838d72262326b26b6225f.jpg

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