Narrative of the Life of FREDERICK DOUGLASS

¨Freedom now appeared, to disappear no more forever. It was heard in every sound, and seen in every thing. It was heard in every sound, and seen in every thing. It was ever present to torment me with a sense of my wretched condition.¨(Douglass, 55)
¨Through conscious of the difficulty of learning without a teacher, I set out with high hope, and a fixed purpose, at what cost of trouble, to learn how to read. The very decided manner with which he spoke, and strove to impress his wife with the evil consequences of giving me instruction, served to convince me that he was deeply sensible of the truths he was uttering.¨(Douglass, 49)
¨His fame as an overseer went abroad. His horrid crime was not even submitted to judicial investigation. It was committed in the presence of slaves, and they of course could neither institute a suit, nor testify against him; and thus the guilty perpetrator of one of the bloodiest and most foul murders goes un-whipped of justice, and uncensured by the community in which he lives.¨(Douglass, 41)
¨I assert most unhesitatingly, that the religion of the south is a mere covering for the most horrid crimes, a justifier of the most appalling barbarity, a sanctifier of the most hateful frauds, and a dark shelter under which the darkest, foulest, grossest, and most infernal deeds of a slaveholders find the strongest protection.¨

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