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Love & Science A love for people and science creates a career in caring

Victoria Bailey has always loved two things--science and people. She found both at Mississippi University for Women.

After one year at a community college, Bailey began searching for more. She needed greater interaction and a connection to campus life. After researching and touring around the state of Mississippi, Bailey found what she describes at the “cutest little campus” in Columbus.Victoria Bailey has always loved two things--science and people. She found both at Mississippi University for Women.

After one year at a community college, Bailey began searching for more. She needed greater interaction and a connection to campus life. After researching and touring around the state of Mississippi, Bailey found what she describes at the “cutest little campus” in Columbus.

“The two years that I've spent in the nursing program have been the two best years. I've met some of the most amazing friends and faculty that I'm close with,” said Bailey.

The first-generation college student from Brandon attributes her love for people to her dad and his career as a used car salesperson. She remembers at a young age spending time with him and being able to describe random cars on the lot. Through school, she fell in love with the health sciences. The combination led her to a career in nursing.

Her love for others inspired her to make the best of some of the difficult moments in a nurse’s career. She has learned to hold the hand of a grandparent in the hospital and lead a family through difficult times while a family member was in ICU. For Bailey, nursing is personal because nurses have affected her personally.

She admits that nursing school is not easy and there have been times of little sleep and some tears, but there was always someone there for support.

Bailey said, “the faculty are the ones saying ‘just keep going,’ ‘it's okay’, ‘you're fine.’ They are so encouraging. I am not exaggerating. We could not have done it without them. Their hearts are in it. Nursing is what they love, but they love us too. We all have such a close relationship with our faculty.”

Bailey will soon begin a career in the Emergency Room at St. Dominic Hospital in Jackson. At the beginning of nursing school, her goal was to work in women’s health or labor and delivery. The further she progressed in school, her passion changed to a fast-paced critical care setting.

Through The W, Bailey has logged more than 400 clinical hours to prepare her. She admits she stopped tallying the hours at 400 when preparing her resume.

“I feel confident that they did teach us a lot in the classroom. We have that textbook information. But you know, real-world experience will take you far. They put us in so many clinicals. They prepared us immensely for the independence that comes with nursing and the stress and all kinds of situations,” said Bailey.

The first-generation college student from Brandon attributes her love for people to her dad and his career as a used car salesperson. She remembers at a young age spending time with him and being able to describe random cars on the lot. Through school, she fell in love with the health sciences. The combination led her to a career in nursing.

Her love for others inspired her to make the best of some of the difficult moments in a nurse’s career. She has learned to hold the hand of a grandparent in the hospital and lead a family through difficult times while a family member was in ICU. For Bailey, nursing is personal because nurses have affected her personally.

She admits that nursing school is not easy and there have been times of little sleep and some tears, but there was always someone there for support.

Bailey said, “the faculty are the ones saying ‘just keep going,’ ‘it's okay’, ‘you're fine.’ They are so encouraging. I am not exaggerating. We could not have done it without them. Their hearts are in it. Nursing is what they love, but they love us too. We all have such a close relationship with our faculty.”

Bailey will soon begin a career in the Emergency Room at St. Dominic Hospital in Jackson. At the beginning of nursing school, her goal was to work in women’s health or labor and delivery. The further she progressed in school, her passion changed to a fast-paced critical care setting.

Through The W, Bailey has logged more than 400 clinical hours to prepare her. She admits she stopped tallying the hours at 400 when preparing her resume.

“I feel confident that they did teach us a lot in the classroom. We have that textbook information. But you know, real-world experience will take you far. They put us in so many clinicals. They prepared us immensely for the independence that comes with nursing and the stress and all kinds of situations,” said Bailey.

COVID-19 has brought many unexpected changes to Bailey this semester. She has moved back to her hometown and has been working as a med tech. Baily has not been able to say good-bye to her friends and faculty members as she would like. To celebrate graduating, Bailey gathered with family and friends to watch the virtual commencement Saturday, May 9. Her graduation trip was canceled due to COVID-19. As consolation, she received a new puppy.

Credits:

Mississippi University for Women