RED DOG MOVIE Review BY OM MAHAJAN

Red dog movie is made in a mining town called Dampier in western Australia. The movie starts with a flashback where it shows how Red dog came into Dampier. Koko(Red dog) is the title character. He was not a dog for one person he was for everyone.

(FILM CRITIC REVIEW BY COMMON SENSE MEDIA)As dog movies go, Red Dog offers some unique framing: It's set in the starkly beautiful Australian Outback; it's told against the tale of the rough-hewn miners he finds a home among. It's a beautifully shot movie in an inherently interesting setting. It doesn't take every opportunity for tear-jerking sentiment, but it is an emotional tale of how this special dog impacted the people he interacted with.There's a lot here for families to mull over about the nature of dog ownership, particularly in the message that we don't really own our pets, we merely get to live with them. Kids who love dogs will likely be fascinated by the legendary tale of this dog's loyalty. Like all movies celebrating pets, this one deals with loss directly. Parents who've reconciled the setting and excessive, ever-present drinking, and scrappiness may enjoy this family foray into the joys and sorrows of pet ownership

NEWS OF RED DOG

ANALYSES OF MOVIE 'RED DOG' :- FILM TECHNIQUES: USE OF CAMERA Extreme long shots are used to emphasise to viewers that the area setting is vast, open and bare. This shows that Pilbara is a very desert-like and country land. The film uses under shots to make viewers feel small and over shots to make the viewer feel big. An undershot in the movie is when the men place bets on how fast Red Dog can eat. This makes us feel intimidated and scared and small. Over the shoulder shots are used when characters are talking and close-ups on the faces when they are talking. This lets viewers see the reactions and expressions on the characters face when listening and talking. Medium shots are used to show viewers a bigger area of the targeted character. Long shots are used to show the character and where they are. It shows viewers the landscape and gives people an idea of where the character is at that point of time.

MUSIC AND SOUND The music in this movie is a range of emotional and upbeat songs. But when there is an important announcement like Jocko's speech, silence is accompanied. When John Proposes to Nancy, it's silent with background noises. Such as insects, barbecue sizzling an a fire crackling. These sounds give viewers a good idea that the scene is at night and in the outback where these sounds are most likely to occur. This implies that the speech is important and should be payed close attention. When Red Dog is dying and eventually dead, the music used is melancholy and emotional. The same music is used when John dies. A link between the two scenes. This tells viewers that this scene is sad, special and has a great impact on the characters in the movie. But at the end of the film the music is upbeat which tells the viewer that the movie ends on a happy note. The music is authentic to the 1970's which tells viewers that the movie is set in the 70's.

SYMBOLISM :-A symbol used in this film is the red dirt. This signifies that Australia is a very dirty and dusty country. It also blends in with Red Dog's fur as he is a red kelpie. Another is the 'blazing sun'. It gives viewers an idea that Australia is a very harsh climate because of the hot weather. This means that the characters in the film must wear clothes to keep them cool. As Australia is a hot country, the symbol is very appropriate. Another symbol is the beer drinking. Australians love their beer and are known for drinking it excessively. A beer at the end of a hard, dirty day's work is very Australian.

CHARACTERS:- The characters in the film are how Australians really are. They have good humour and can insult each other without taking real offense. They reflect the attitude of Australians in their way of language and how they say things. They use colloquial language, slang and joke around with each other. Many Australians do this today also. They are a multicultural society which is exactly what Australia is. People from all around the world are characters in this movie. They also drink lots of beer, appear rough and are dirty and grimy. One of the characters, Peeto, has a feminine side which is ironic because he is portrayed as a rough manly man. The clothes that the men wear are singlets, short shorts and boots. The women wear dresses. They wear clothes that keep them cool, giving the viewers an understanding that the weather in Australia is harsh, dry and hot.

QUOTES:- "The world is a funny place, no? Sometimes you pick your dog. Sometimes your dog picks you." this quote by Vanno emphasises that Red Dog picked John as his master and John had no say. John was Red Dog's true master. If Red Dog picked John he would obey to no one else. Another quote used was "More than a man's best friend." This is related to the term of friendship because it means that Red Dog was more than just a dog. He was considered to be a friend and member of the community. Red Dog was considered to be family and everyone was his owner but not in control of him. He had a free reign and was allowed privileges in the community. This gave a sense of Red Dog being a person instead of a dog. EXTREME LONG SHOT UNDERSHOT This is the last scene on Red Dog where there is a happy atmosphere and an upeat song PEETO SYMBOLS AND LANGUAGE

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++OM's Review+++++++++++++++++++++++++ This Movie was made from the story of REAL red dog (pilbara wanderer). When i saw the movie trailer i thought it will be boring but when i saw the actual movie my mind got changed. This movie is funny and sad at the end. Director had made the story beautiful.

******************************************The movie 'Red Dog' was released in August 4, 2011**************************************

*****************SOURCE :- https://prezi.com/dv8_-ktjktqn/red-dog-film-analysis/ , Google images ********************************************************************************

Made with Adobe Slate

Make your words and images move.

Get Slate

Report Abuse

If you feel that this video content violates the Adobe Terms of Use, you may report this content by filling out this quick form.

To report a Copyright Violation, please follow Section 17 in the Terms of Use.