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THE NEXT 500 FUTURE LEADERS OF CONGO TOGETHER WE ARE WRITING A NEW STORY IN CONGO

"Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world." - Nelson Mandela
Democratic Republic of Congo

The historical narrative of the Democratic Republic of Congo is about endless cycles of violence, exploitation, and captivity.

For 300 years, its peoples were seized and enslaved in the Americas and elsewhere (c1500-1885).

ENSLAVED

Then, in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Belgian imperial rule was imposed and maintained through systematic genocide and pillage of Congo’s resources (1885-1960). 10 MILLION people were beaten, whipped, maimed, killed, and forcibly conscripted to build roads, railroads, and infrastructure for the colonial state, and to harvest and export rubber and other of our abundant resources for the commerce and industries of Europe.

10 MILLION

Congo’s post-colonial history has been more of the same – predatory structures of power, systemic and continuing violence and war, mass killings, sexual violence, extraction and theft of natural resources through complicity of local and international players, and rampant poverty continue to hold Congo’s people captive (1960-present).

5.4 MILLION PEOPLE HAVE DIED SINCE 1998
48 WOMEN RAPED EVERY HOUR AT HEIGHT OF WAR
1 IN 10 CHILDREN DIE BEFORE AGE FIVE DUE TO HUNGER OR DISEASE
3.9 MILLION PEOPLE DISPLACED OVERALL
CONFLICT MINERALS FUEL AND SUSTAIN ARMED VIOLENCE

CONGO IS IN CRISIS

The root cause of this crisis can be traced to a critical lack of ethical and service-minded leaders who advance the common good. Consequently, the whole nation is compromised: civil society, churches and religious organizations, the legal system, the economy, natural resource management, and education are all affected by this lack of leadership.

Numerous humanitarian organizations are spending millions of dollars in Congo every year, but most are not addressing the root cause of this crisis.

WE BELIEVE, WE ARE.

In the midst of a challenging context, and out of an already resilient society, a new liberating and transformative narrative is being written and lived. It begins at the Christian Bilingual University of Congo (UCBC), where committed Congolese visionaries are developing (and nurturing) a redemptive community of passionate, young men and women.

WHAT MAKES UCBC UNIQUE?

Christian Vision of Transformation

Bilingualism

Rigorous Academics

Community Engagement

Work and Service Programs

Integrated Research

Women’s Equality

Justice Advocacy

Environmental Sustainability

“In our study and community life at UCBC, we are being intellectually grounded through solid and rigorous academic inquiry, spiritually challenged to develop ethical and moral principles with which to live, and inspired to live an authentic commitment to service. We can and will be the change we want in Congo. We are Congo’s future leaders, in all walks of life, in all our communities, in our government, civil society, and faith communities.” - UCBC Students

It continues in shaping these women and men as students equipped through professional and formative education at the highest level.

It is witnessed in the UCBC alumni, a transforming generation, who identify, own, and respond to Congo’s challenges with skill, dedication, excellence, creativity, and Christian hope.

500 UCBC ALUMNI

WHERE ARE THEY NOW?

Alumni are making an impact across Congo and beyond, and here are some examples:

8 are working in bank enterprises.

More than 20 are working with CI or UCBC.

6 are working in the mining industry.

More than 100 are innovating new start-ups and businesses or working as consultants.

More than 15 are serving as pastors in churches.

More than 50 are working in national and international NGO’s based in eastern Congo.

3 are working with the DRC government.

More than 50 are pursuing advanced studies at universities across east Africa.

“I realized at UCBC, that my accomplishments in economics was a gift I needed to use to help others. I felt called to teach, encourage, and help others manage their money in order to come out of poverty."
BUTOTO MAHINDUZI (’15) is now the project director and co-founder Neema Congo, a resource and capacity building program where all people, even those with the most limited access to resources, can actively and sustainably secure their livelihoods through entrepreneurship and small business ventures.
“I chose to attend UCBC because I wanted to study at a university different from others in Congo. UCBC is promoting spiritual values and virtues that we don't find in other universities."
CLARISSE NGOYI ('16 ) graduated at the top of her class. She now works as director of marketing for SICOVIR, a business enterprise which produces locally sourced soaps made from palm oil.

STORIES OF TRANSFORMATION

“YES, WE ARE CONGO’S FUTURE. YOU, WHO READ OUR WORDS, ARE ALSO OUR FUTURE." - UCBC STUDENTS
WE CAN’T WRITE THIS STORY ALONE.

WHAT IT COSTS

Full UCBC tuition is just $2,200 per year. Students and their families make extraordinary sacrifices to pay $400 per year, on average (95% of Congo’s annual per capita gross national income). This leaves a balance of $1,800 required to fully fund each student.

For the cost of educating ONE student at a Christian college in the U.S., 12 FUTURE LEADERS of Congo can be educated at UCBC.

BE A CATALYST

Catalyze a movement to write a new story in Congo through a pledged gift of $1,800 per year for the next four years. Through your generosity, you will provide one student the opportunity to attend UCBC, equipping him/her to be a transformational leader for Congo.

JOIN US

Join us in writing the next chapter of this story by accompanying Congo’s next 500 transformational leaders, enabling them to receive a UCBC education. Match their financial commitment with one of your own. As you do so, we are committed to sharing monthly stories like the Stories of Transformation you watched above so you can witness how your investment brings lasting change.

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