Muhammad Ali Trial WHEN JUSTICE CHANGED ALL

The following article is going to look back on the Supreme Court Trial of Muhammad Ali. There will be information as to how all of it started and how things changed after the trial, both for Ali and America. Muhammad notably impacted mainstream American culture by simply refusing to go into the Military when he was sent his draft notice, and it was all because of his religion.

Classes Clay became a member of the Nation of Islam on February 25, 1964 and the following week the leader announced that he was renamed Muhammad Ali. Ali followed the religion for many years in advance which meant he prayed as many times as he could a day, and he followed all the other traditions. Though in February of 1966 the Selective Service informed him that he was finally eligible for the draft and could sure in the military. Muhammad replied that he was a pacifist and would not go to war because it was against his religion. This is where the problem began for Ali and when the country slowly turned it's back on him.

After Ali refused to go into the Military he was automatically stripped of his heavyweight title and people started to remove his name from anything that involved boxing. Ali was then convicted of draft evasion (an intentional decision not to comply with the military conscription policies of one's nation), was sentenced to five years in jail, had a fine of $10,000, and was banned from boxing for four years. Ali also had his pass port taken away so he could not fight in other countries, making impossible to continue his career as a boxer. Though judges of the supreme court had a ruling which was not in Ali's favor the first time, but the second time judges had read a book by Malcom X clarifying Ali's religion and he won back his right to box again after three years of fighting.

The fight for Ali all started from 1967 to 1971 and it was not easy for him to explain himself the whole time to white people that would not listen. Until finally they read a book by Malcom X and understood what his religion stood for and why he was putting up such a fight. The whole time Ali was't just thinking about his religion, he was also thinking about his skin color. He couldn't understand why the white man wanted to dress him up and send him thousands of miles aways from home just to shoot more people of color. Ali had no quarrel with the Viet-Cong it was the people that wanted him to go against his religion and sacrifice everything he had ever accomplished that he had a problem with. Ali never gave up the fight for his religion and because of that on June 30, 1973 the United States formally ended the draft and began to rely on an all volunteer Army. Ali changed a way of living for everyone just by simply opening up peoples eyes to how much damage they are doing at home.

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Payten King
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Created with images by cliff1066™ - "Muhammad Ali"

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