From Roaring To Depression Calyn Carbone

The 1920s was a decade of great progress. It was known as the “boom” decade for its prosperity. People were so set on “living in the moment” that they ignored the economic problems occurring at that time. They wanted to make the most of their lives.

DANCE YOUR CARES AWAY

During the 1920s, young modernists enjoyed going out and dancing.

Consumerism was on the rise during the 1920s. Due to the increase in “convenience items,” or items that made people’s lives easier, people had more time to partake in activities for fun, such as dancing, movies, and parties. During Prohibition, it was likely that you could find many people at illegal bars called speakeasies.

FLAPPERS BREAK TRADITION

Women in the “Roaring Twenties” broke tradition. These women were often called “flappers” and were known for their nonconservative behavior.

Young women called “flappers” were known for their non conservative behavior and bold fashion statements. There was a large enthusiasm for women’s rights after the nineteenth amendment was passed in 1920.

INVEST IN THE STOCK MARKET

People continued to invest in the ever-growing Stock Market.

Bankers and stockbrokers were wild and irresponsible during the “Roaring Twenties.” They made millions off the stock market. Everyone was investing in the increasing stock market, thinking it would only continue to rise. Bankers and stockbrokers lived a life of excessive luxury, disregarding the warnings of an economic crash. Like everyone else, they were ignorant of the problems developing.

FARMS FOR SALE AFTER FORECLOSURES

Farmers lost their farms to foreclosure because they could not pay their loans.

Not everyone was part of the “boom” of the Twenties. Many farmers lost their farms to foreclosure.

SURPLUS GROWING ON FARMS

Farmers purchased new technology and machinery for their products but did not sell as much as they had hoped.

After WWI, there was a decrease in demand for farm products. Therefore, surplus grew and incomes decreased.

KU KLUX KLAN RISES

During the 1920s, the Ku Klux Klan discriminated against African Americans. The government did nothing to stop these gangs.

The 1920s was a positive and negative experience for African Americans. They were segregated and discriminated against. The Ku Klux Klan victimized African Americans, continuing their cruel ways.

LOUIS ARMSTRONG TO PERFORM

Jazz music allowed African Americans to express their feelings and beliefs.

However, many African Americans participated in the Harlem Renaissance, an artistic and cultural movement. It allowed them to prosper and express themselves. They became truly proud to be African Americans.

AMERICA WANTS REPUBLICANS

Three presidents governed during the 1920s, all Republican: Warren G. Harding (1920-1923), Calvin Coolidge (1923-1929), and Herbert Hoover (1929-1933).

Government continued to abide by laissez-faire policy during this decade. This allowed businesses much freedom, and they used this power in unjust ways. The government also returned to the “no foreign entanglements” approach of George Washington and adopted isolationist policies with regard to world affairs.

WALL ST. IN PANIC AS STOCKS CRASH

The Stock Market crashed on Tuesday, October 29, 1929, also known as “Black Tuesday.”

Just as the 1920s “boomed,” the decade following “busted.” On October 29th, 1929, the stock market crashed. People panicked as they lost millions of dollars.

BANKS UNABLE TO REPAY LOANS

People lined up at banks after the Stock Market crashed. However, many banks were unable to give people back their money due to unpaid loans and bad investments in the stock market.

Banks were unable to give people back their money due to unpaid loans and bad investments in the stock market. Banks across America shut their doors.

SHANTYTOWNS RENAMED "HOOVERVILLES"

Makeshift homes in “Shantytowns” were established outside of cities during the Great Depression. These were nicknamed Hoovervilles for the widely disliked president during that time, Herbert Hoover.

Businesses closed and laid off workers. The unemployment rate reached 25% in 1933. Many families were in severe poverty. Families barely had enough money to buy food. Shantytowns were established outside of cities, and were soon nicknamed “Hoovervilles” for the widely disliked president during that time, Herbert Hoover. Soup kitchens were opened for the poor.

DUST STORMS HIT MIDWEST

Dust storms caused widespread crop failure during the Great Depression.

The agricultural economy continued to suffer greatly. Drought brought deadly dust storms that destroyed crops and homes. The demand for farm products continued to drop.

OKIES MOVE TO CALIFORNIA

Due to the failure brought by the Dust Bowl and foreclosures, farmers migrated to California to find a better life.

Due to the large number of foreclosures, many farmers left their homes and moved to California. These migrants were called Okies, and they faced a lot of prejudice, but eventually prospered in California.

FRANKLIN DELANO ROOSEVELT WINS IN A LANDSLIDE

Roosevelt won the election of 1933 over Herbert Hoover.

Hoover believed in limited government involvement. However, many Americans in need believed that the resolution to their problem lay in government assistance. Hoover’s strategy of “trickle-down economics” was not heavily favored.

The election of Franklin Delano Roosevelt made people hopeful. They believed he would take action that would improve their lives.

NEW DEAL PROGRAMS TO BEGIN

Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “New Deal” programs were created to stabilize the economy.

His “New Deal” programs were meant to stabilize the economy, but were not considered ultimately successful because he failed to fully pull the country out of the Depression. It took a second World War to accomplish this.

LEARN TO "MAKE DO"

During the Great Depression, women learned to “cut corners” by sewing their own clothes or “make do” by baking their own bread and designing dishes with leftovers.

The Depression affected all walks of life except the wealthy. The middle and working classes learned to “make do” by sewing their own clothes, baking their own bread, and designing dishes with leftovers.

NEW MOVIES SHOWING AT THE CINEMA

Americans used the cinema to escape from reality during the Great Depression.

Americans found escapes from the struggles of reality. They went to the cinema.

PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT TALKS TO THE NATION

Franklin D. Roosevelt made wide use of radio with his periodic “fireside chats.”

They also listened to the radio. President Roosevelt made wide use of radio with his periodic “fireside chats.”

JAZZ BAND PERFORMING

African Americans found an escape from the struggles of the Great Depression through music. Jazz raised the morale of a frightened country.

Americans embraced music, such as jazz, and used it to express their feelings about the decade.

This boom to bust decline marked the beginning of the worst economic crisis in United States history, the Great Depression.

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