Children in the Elizabethan Era By aden waters

Queen Elizabeth I. Photography. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/139_1909740/1/139_1909740/cite. Accessed 6 Mar 2017.

Children Were Often Considered to be Miniature Versions of Their Parents

Children often dressed in clothes that resemble adults that they most commonly come in contact with most likely parents or family members. All children were brought up to obey their parents and to be very polite to them, A book written in 1656 reminded children always to stand up when they spoke to their parents and never interrupt them.

Jones, Madeline. Growing up in Stuart Times. London, B.T. Batsford, 1979.

Children Were Often Disciplined and Raised by Their Fathers

The most important member of any Stuart family, rich or poor, was the father. Most fathers believed that it was their duty to "correct" their children, that is to beat them if they misbehaved. Even royal princes were "corrected" in this way. The little Duke of Gloucester, a dedicated child and son of princess Anne, who was soon to become queen, was beaten by his father for refusing to walk upstairs on his own, and for not taking his medicine.

Jones, Madeline. Growing up in Stuart Times. London, B.T. Batsford, 1979.

In the Elizabethan Era There was a Very High Mortality Rate for Children

Women, especially rich women who married young, often had a lot of children. However, so many babies died that in a family where 11 or 12 children were born only one or two might grow up. Seven of Sir Thomas Pelham's 15 children died before their father.

Jones, Madeline. Growing up in Stuart Times. London, B.T. Batsford, 1979.

Expectations of Children's Behavior

Children were expected to behave politely and obey their parents, they were suppose to be Courteous. If they were not they would be beaten by their father or male guardian if the father was not available.

SINGING SCHOOL. - Old-time singing school. Wood engraving, American, 19th century.. Fine Art. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/140_1676711/1/140_1676711/cite. Accessed 8 Mar 2017.

Education in the Elizabethan Era

Children who were in very poor families would get little to no education but children in high middle class or royal families had very good education which inclued tutors for rich families.

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Created with images by tonynetone - "William Shakespeare"

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