Spider Martin Nakya Morgan

James "spider" Martin

An American photographer known for his work documenting the American Civil Rights Movement in 1965, specifically Bloody Sunday and other incidents from the Selma to Montgomery marches.

He was born April 1, 1939 in Fairfield, AL and passed April 8, 2003 in Blount Springs.

February 18, 1965, a young African American church deacon named Jimmie Lee Jackson was shot by an Alabama state trooper during a peaceful protest against discriminatory voter registration practices in the small town of Marion.

This incident was not regarded as “big news” at the time, and so to cover it, The Birmingham News dispatched one of its newest and youngest photographers. Spider Martin. Spider did so much for the streets of Alabama. He was close to Martin Luther King himself, and a big impact on the world of photography.

This incident was not regarded as “big news” at the time, and so to cover it, The Birmingham News dispatched one of its newest and youngest photographers. Spider Martin. Spider did so much for the streets of Alabama. He was close to Martin Luther King himself, and a big impact on the world of photography.

"Spider, we could have marched, we could have protested forever,but if it weren’t for guys like you, it would have been for nothing.. The whole world saw your pictures. That’s why the Voting Rights Act passed.”

— "Spider, we could have marched, we could have protested forever, but if it weren’t for guys like you, it would have been for nothing. The whole world saw your pictures. That’s why the Voting Rights Act passed.”

— Martin Luther King 1965

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