Theatre in Shakespeare's Time

The Globe Theatre 1613, London.. Photograph. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/113_925828/1/113_925828/cite. Accessed 13 Mar 2017.

In the time of Shakespeare´s plays, women were not welcomed to be apart of the play. Women were rarely respected in society at this period in time. (¨Society and Culture in Shakespeare´s Day.¨ pg 24-45)

Shakespeare was an actor and the term that was used to refer to actors was sharer. ("William Shakespeare." Encyclopedia of World Biography, pg 142-145)

The theater could hold about 2,500-3,000, the theater tended to be packed, with no particular way of reserving their seating. ("Society and Culture in Shakespeare’s Day." vol. 1, pg 24-45)

Ophelia in William Shakespeare.. Photograph. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/113_906958/1/113_906958/cite. Accessed 15 Mar 2017.

Both noble and non noble people attended Shakespeare´s plays. Though, the majority of people that did attend were men, for in this time women were not respected. ("Society and Culture in Shakespeare’s Day." vol. 1, pp. 24-45.)

When the audience disliked the performance, they would find ways to show displeasure, such as talk among each other. (Woog, pg78.)

The original Globe theater we learned had been burnt down. Shakespeare´s Globe was burned down in 1613 during one of the performances. A cannon was fired to give a special effect burning it to the ground. (Allison, 8-9.)

The Globe Theater (mislabeled the 'Bear-Baiting arena') as shown in a detail from Wenceslaus Hollar's 'Long View' of London, England, 1647.. Fine Art. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016.

We learn that later the Globe theater was rebuild. (Allison, 8-9.) It was rebuild with the timbers from its predecessor, or the previous theater remains, used throughout construction. ("Society and Culture in Shakespeare’s Day." vol. 1, pg 24-45.)

IMAGE CITATIONS: Image one: LONDON: GLOBE THEATRE. - The Globe Theater (mislabeled the 'Bear-Baiting arena') as shown in a detail from Wenceslaus Hollar's 'Long View' of London, England, 1647.. Fine Art. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. Image two: The Globe Theatre 1613, London.. Photograph. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. Image three: Ophelia in William Shakespeare.. Photograph. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/113_906958/1/113_906958/cite. Accessed 15 Mar 2017.

INFORMATION CITATIONS: Source one:(Medici, Anthony G. "Society and Culture in Shakespeare’s Day." The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare, by William Baker and Kenneth Womack, vol. 1, Facts on File, 2012, pp. 24-45. Facts On File Library of World Literature. Gale Virtual Reference Library, ) Source two: ("William Shakespeare." Encyclopedia of World Biography, 2nd ed., vol. 14, Gale, 2004, pp. 142-145. Gale Virtual Reference Library, ) Source three: (Medici, Anthony G. "Society and Culture in Shakespeare’s Day." The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare, by William Baker and Kenneth Womack, vol. 1, Facts on File, 2012, pp. 24-45. Facts On File Library of World Literature. Gale Virtual Reference Library,) Source four: (Medici, Anthony G. "Society and Culture in Shakespeare’s Day." The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare, by William Baker and Kenneth Womack, vol. 1, Facts on File, 2012, pp. 24-45. Facts On File Library of World Literature. Gale Virtual Reference Library, ) Source five: (Woog, Adam. "Chapter Seven The Elizabethan Audience." A History of the Elizabethan Theater. San Diego: Lucent, 2003. 78. Print.) Source six: (Allison, Amy. "Important Dates in the Building of Shakespeare´s Globe." Shakespeare's Globe. San Diego: Lucent, 2000. 8-9. Print.) Source Seven: (Medici, Anthony G. "Society and Culture in Shakespeare’s Day." The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare, by William Baker and Kenneth Womack, vol. 1, Facts on File, 2012, pp. 24-45. Facts On File Library of World Literature. Gale Virtual Reference Library, )

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