Tyler Moss Advanced photography portfolio

Learning Experience

I came into this class with an already-present love for art, but more so film as opposed to photography. Due to this, I think that I was sort of stuck in the mindset of using visuals to tell a story. While this practice is certainly present in photography as well, I found that when I focused less on actually trying to communicate some sort of plot or happening, and instead focused more simply on evoking an emotion, I ended up favoring them. While I do think that photography is a proper medium for storytelling, I don't think that it is necessarily true for every case. In that respect, I think I can say that I learned to try and play to the strengths of both the subject that I was photographing, and the photography itself.

Project #1 - Meaning through Camera Functions

The main objective of this assignment was to use both aperture and shutter speed in an effort to communicate something. While I leaned more heavily into the shutter speed in an attempt to portray action, I am fairly happy with how the majority of them came out.

Skills Learned

I began this class with a fair bit of camera knowledge, granted more geared towards film and video production, but I am glad that I had the opportunity to try my hand at skills specific to photography. The two that stand out most to me would have to be working with film and the strobes. This class was the first time that I shot on film from start to finish, and I ended up enjoying it much more than I previously would have guessed. Learning to shoot knowing that I don't have a near-limitless number of shots certainly caused me to be more careful and considerate when shooting. The flash photography, on the other hand, taught me to think about light in ways that I never had before. The trial-and-error style of shooting that I had to adopt, while painstaking, taught me the level of control that strobes allow for.

Project #2 - Artist Intervention

For this project, we were tasked with making some sort of intervention into a space, be it physically or digitally, in order to bring out or accent some aspect of the space. I think that the most successful out of the group would have to be the digital interventions, because they are more effective at displaying and commenting on the space than the one on the road does.

Analysis of Contemporary Photography

We were shown numerous artists this semester, with nearly every one of them being clearly and distinctly separated from the others in terms of both art style and theme. It was interesting to see how two different artists could try and tackle a similar theme, but yet still be able to see such a stark difference of execution. It seems to me that nearly all of the more successful contemporary artists that we were shown this semester had a good balance between toying with artistic conventions, and simplicity. The former may be more obvious than the latter, but that doesn't mean that they are not equally important. By simplicity, I do not necessarily mean not complex, because many of the images we saw were very technically complicated, however they were simple in their scope. The most successful images did not bite off more than they could chew, and excelled at honing the theme they wanted to tackle.

Project #3 - Still Life

The goal of this project was to create a still life that played with optical illusions. I took this opportunity to try my hand at flash photography, because I was fascinated by it when I first saw it used by Matt Lipps. This would probably be the project that I stumbled through the most. I went in with a pretty good idea of the effects that I wanted to create, and although it took a whole lot of trial and error, I am happy to say that I was able to create some semblance of the vision that I originally had in my head.

Final Project

Created By
Ty Moss
Appreciate

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