Area & Perimeter Of squares and rectangles

Squares and rectangles are all around us. Look around the room you are currently in and identify three of each.

Now that you have identified them, let's learn how to find the perimeter and area of each.

A square has four identical side lengths, so the perimeter can be found by multiplying one side length by four. For example, a square with four side lengths of 6 inches would have a perimeter of 24 inches (6 x 4 = 24). The area is also simple to find by squaring one side length. The square in our example would have an area of 36 inches squared (6^2 = 36).

Rectangles require another step because they have two sets of identical side lengths. The perimeter is found by multiplying the length by by two and adding the width multiplied by two. A rectangle with a length of 10 and a width of 3 would have a perimeter of 26 [(2 x 10) + (2 x 3)] = 26 inches. The area is found by multiplying the length by the width. Our example rectangle would have an area of 30 inches squared (10 x 3 = 30).

Now, we will watch two short, but engaging videos to help you remember how to calculate the perimeter of squares and rectangles, then the area of both. Enjoy!

Now that we have learned how to find the area and perimeter of squares and rectangles, we are going to do a fun activity with Cheezits. Please get a piece of paper to record your answers to hand in for a grade.

First, you will create a square by using 9 Cheezits, then find the perimeter and the area. Next, repeat the process with 16, then 32 Cheezits.

Ex. A square made with four Cheezits would have a perimeter of 8 inches, and an area of 4 inches squared. See picture below.

Next, you will create a rectangle out of 6 Cheezits and find the area and perimeter. You will repeat this process with 8 and 15 Cheezits.

Ex. A rectangle made with three Cheezits would have a perimeter of 8 inches, and an area of 3 inches squared. See picture below.

For more fun activities with food such as the one used above, please visit http://www.upperelementarysnapshots.com/2015/08/top-15-edible-lessons.html#.Veuj-f-9KK0

Thank you for your participation and I hope you learned something new from this lesson!

Credits:

Annemarie Bucholtz

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