Uluru Ayers rock

The location and significance of Uluru.
Uluru is in the heart of the Northern Territory. The nearest large town is Alice Springs.
Uluru was placed in the Aboriginals hands in 1985. They fiercely protect Uluru as they believe that it is sacred. Uluru is more than just a rock, it is a living cultural landscape. The spirits of the ancestral beings continue to reside in these sacred places making the land a deeply important part of Aboriginal cultural identity. It was first settled about 10,000 years ago. It marks the site of significant events such as The Dreaming. Aboriginals have been fighting for Uluru climbing to be banned since 1985.
Location, maps, and dreaming story's.
Uluru on Australian map, as you can see Alice Springs is quite close to it.
Uluru from above. As you can see it is in the shape of a irregular square with a pointed tip at the right.
Contour map of Uluru. This contour map shows us that the rock starts at about 100m then rises to 450m, then around the top it is 805m. On the top it is quite flat.
There are quite a few dreamtime stories about Uluru. According to Uluru Dreamtime, the world was a featureless place until the ancestors of the Anangu emerged and travelled across the land creating the features like Uluru that we see today.
Environment
Though a desert environment, Uluru is still home to a surprising number of Birds, Animals, and Plants. Trees - Wanari are Australia's most common tree. It covers huge arid areas. What looks like leaves are actually flattened leaf stems. These trees usually die from fires, so they have adapted and now need heat for the seeds to grow. Each part of the tree has a traditional use. The heavy, hard wood is the firewood. On Uluru there are also many shrubs, flowers, fruits, and grasses.
Animals - Uluru is home to a variety of animals. If you visit the area, your most likely to see birds and reptiles, but at sunrise you might be lucky to spot one of the unusual mammals. One animal you would spot would be a wallaby. (Mala) This small wallaby live in mainly patches of spinifex. You might also spot a small marsupial mole. You would see these in sand dunes. Red kangaroos also are quite common.
Landscape - Uluru is made of a type of rock called arkose. If you walk upon Uluru you would notice that it is red and flaky with grey patches. Climate - Uluru is situated near the centre of a semi arid desert , temperatures can range from 3.5 degrees in July to 37.5 during January. Uluru approximately only receives 12 inches of rain a year, the climate is very, very extreme.

Uluru's environment has been challenged over time by people climbing it and trampling the shrubs and greenery. They also break the rocks and if people keep walking upon it's surfaces it will eventually turn to rubble.

The effect of the tourism industry on Uluru.
The tourism industry effects Uluru quite terribly. An Anangu elder, Barbara Tijkadu has a message for people who climb: " That's a really sacred thing that your climbing....You shouldn't climb. It's not the real thing about the place." There are also environmental and safety concerns. Park officials say that the climbing path has been worn down by the constant thread of tourists., with erosion changing the face of Uluru.a lack of toilets and bins on top means that the waste left by tourists are affecting nearby waterholes.
Sustainability
To secure Uluru for further generations, the climbing needs to be stopped!!!!! It is ruining the paths and eventually, once the path is worn down to much it will break. Then, if the climbing continues they will most likely make another path that will break down aswell. This area is sacred and if it is changed to much it won't be sacred anymore. One major sustainability issue is Uluru being used as a toilet. Either there needs to be a toliet built up there or the climbing needs to stop.
A major action that needs to be taken.
A major action that needs to be taken is simply for the climbing to stop.
Change
In the future, Uluru might look worn out and ruined, it won't look like how it did or how it did now unless the climbing of Uluru is shut down, this is quite unlikely as it is so popular.

Credits:

Created with images by swampa - "Uluru" • pradeepbharadwaj@rocketmail.com - "aboriginal paintings in the cave of the uluru" • shaire productions - "Rocky Surface" • shaire productions - "Rocky Surface" • pradeepbharadwaj@rocketmail.com - "aboriginal paintings in the cave of the uluru" • shaire productions - "Rocky Surface" • pradeepbharadwaj@rocketmail.com - "aboriginal paintings in the cave of the uluru" • shaire productions - "Rocky Surface" • shaire productions - "Rocky Surface" • shaire productions - "Rocky Surface" • pradeepbharadwaj@rocketmail.com - "aboriginal paintings in the cave of the uluru" • shaire productions - "Rocky Surface" • pradeepbharadwaj@rocketmail.com - "aboriginal paintings in the cave of the uluru" • shaire productions - "Rocky Surface" • pradeepbharadwaj@rocketmail.com - "aboriginal paintings in the cave of the uluru" • shaire productions - "Rocky Surface" • pradeepbharadwaj@rocketmail.com - "aboriginal paintings in the cave of the uluru" • shaire productions - "Rocky Surface"

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