gender roles in the Elizabeth era Taylor Havens

For women in the Elizabethan Era, gender rights were a thing for the future. Women had little to no rights compared to women today. Their husbands could control them completely but yet they would take care of them.Between the ages of 20-24, some 80% of men and 50% of women were servants (16)Singman, Jeffrey L. “Daily Life in Elizabethan England.” Westport, Connecticut - London: Greenwood, 1995. Print. "Daily Life Through History".Grendler, Paul F. Encyclopedia of the Renaissance 5. New York: Scribner, 1999. Print.Both husband and wife were expected to work although she was normally engaged in labor that could be done at home (30)Singman, Jeffrey L. “Daily Life in Elizabethan England.” Westport, Connecticut - London: Greenwood, 1995. Print. "Daily Life Through History".Grendler, Paul F. Encyclopedia of the Renaissance 5. New York: Scribner, 1999. Print.One of her primary responsibilities was tending to the family livestock (30)Singman, Jeffrey L. “Daily Life in Elizabethan England.” Westport, Connecticut - London: Greenwood, 1995. Print. "Daily Life Through History".Grendler, Paul F. Encyclopedia of the Renaissance 5. New York: Scribner, 1999. Print.Child birth was often a major special occasion for women (37)Singman, Jeffrey L. “Daily Life in Elizabethan England.” Westport, Connecticut - London: Greenwood, 1995. Print. "Daily Life Through History".Grendler, Paul F. Encyclopedia of the Renaissance 5. New York: Scribner, 1999. Print.It was rare for a girl to be admitted to a grammar school, and such an arrangement would only last from the age 7 to 9 or thereabouts. (47)Singman, Jeffrey L. “Daily Life in Elizabethan England.” Westport, Connecticut - London: Greenwood, 1995. Print.The male head of the household controlled the economic resources of the family and made all principal decisions. (E5 456)Singman, Jeffrey L. “Daily Life in Elizabethan England.” Westport, Connecticut - London: Greenwood, 1995. Print.

Queen Elizabeth I. Photography. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/139_1909740/1/139_1909740/cite. Accessed 17 Mar 2017.

The men looked after their wives.Medici, Anthony G. "Society and Culture in Shakespeare’s Day." The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare, by William Baker and Kenneth Womack, vol. 1, Facts on File, 2012, pp. 24-45. Facts On File Library of World Literature. Gale Virtual Reference Library, go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=GVRL&sw=w&u=nysl_ca_queen&v=2.1&id=GALE%7CCX2025400014&it=r&asid=c87445b884972c236c27fad35e6c08ba. Accessed 10 Mar. 2017.

woman jobs were books Written by woman, including cookbooks, fashion books, child-care manuals, and herbals” pg 326Olsen, Kirstin. All Things Shakespeare: An Encyclopedia of Shakespeare's World. Westport, Conn: Greenwood, 2002. Print.Medici, Anthony G. "Society and Culture in Shakespeare’s Day." The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare, by William Baker and Kenneth Womack, vol. 1, Facts on File, 2012, pp. 24-45. Facts On File Library of WorldLiterature. Gale Virtual Reference Library, go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=GVRL&sw=w&u=nysl_ca_queen&v=2.1&id=GALE%7CCX2025400014&it=r&asid=c87445b884972c236c27fad35e6c08ba. Accessed 10 Mar. 2017. “In addition to preserving their virginity, daughters were required to master skills they were later expected to perform as wives and household managers, most important were textile crafts: spinning, weaving, and embroidering.” pg 318Olsen, Kirstin. All Things Shakespeare: An Encyclopedia of Shakespeare's World. Westport, Conn: Greenwood, 2002. Print. “Many women did work and some were masters or trades in their own right.”pg 686Medici, Anthony G. "Society and Culture in Shakespeare’s Day." The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare, by William Baker and Kenneth Womack, vol. 1, Facts on File, 2012, pp. 24-45. Facts On File Library of WorldLiterature. Gale Virtual Reference Library, go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=GVRL&sw=w&u=nysl_ca_queen&v=2.1&id=GALE%7CCX2025400014&it=r&asid=c87445b884972c236c27fad35e6c08ba. Accessed 10 Mar. 2017. “In addition to preserving their virginity, daughters were required to master skills they were later expected to perform as wives and household managers, most important were textile crafts: spinning, weaving, and embroidering.” pg 318Olsen, Kirstin. All Things Shakespeare: An Encyclopedia of Shakespeare's World. Westport, Conn: Greenwood, 2002. Print. “Women were not allowed to participate in politics.”Medici, Anthony G. "Society and Culture in Shakespeare’s Day." The Facts On File Companion to Shakespeare, by William Baker and Kenneth Womack, vol. 1, Facts on File, 2012, pp. 24-45. Facts On File Library of WorldLiterature. Gale Virtual Reference Library, go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=GVRL&sw=w&u=nysl_ca_queen&v=2.1&id=GALE%7CCX2025400014&it=r&asid=c87445b884972c236c27fad35e6c08ba. Accessed 10 Mar. 2017. “In addition to preserving their virginity, daughters were required to master skills they were later expected to perform as wives and household managers, most important were textile crafts: spinning, weaving, and embroidering.” pg 318Olsen, Kirstin. All Things Shakespeare: An Encyclopedia of Shakespeare's World. Westport, Conn: Greenwood, 2002. Print. Women were not allowed to own or inherit property or a title other than royalty. Women were not allowed to participate in politics.

most woman had little to no rights, there husbands controlled them and there kids could be taken away with out them doing anything wrong. the Elizabeth era was not always bad but there was gender roles.

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