ARROWHEAD CENTER July Newsletter

A Note from the Director

Although the NMSU campus has been a bit quieter this month as many of our students have left for the summer, Arrowhead Center is remaining busy as we work with the campus community and innovators and entrepreneurs across New Mexico on a number of exciting ventures.

As you will read, Arrowhead staff and students are collaborating with NMSU faculty members to bring to market a game-changing invention in mechanical and aerospace engineering: a gyroscope that, while developed for space vehicles, could have an impact on areas as far-reaching as passenger cars and health care.

Arrowhead Center will also be advancing our goal to discover and advance more of the exceptional technologies and startup ventures New Mexico has to offer with a substantial grant from the U.S. Small Business Administration’s Federal and State Technology (FAST) program. In the coming year, Arrowhead will be working to bring together commercially promising technologies from university and national laboratory development settings with the entrepreneurs who can get them to market. This is a significant win for the regional innovation ecosystem, the researchers and businesspeople we will assist, and the consumers who will benefit from new products.

You will also read about Arrowhead’s growing efforts to share our programming with international partners through a program that is bringing entrepreneurial education and training to five universities in Mexico. We are confident that this program will herald more partnerships across the border.

Thank you for taking the time to read our newsletter. As always, we at Arrowhead Center are excited to learn what projects and initiatives our partners are undertaking, as well. We look forward to hearing from you.

Kathy Hansen

Director and CEO of Arrowhead Center

ARROWHEAD PARK RECEIVES GRANT TO PLAN DEVELOPMENT OF HEALTH TECHNOLOGY HUB

Date: 05/27/2015

Writer: Amanda Bradford, 575-646-1996, ambradfo@nmsu.edu

Arrowhead Center at New Mexico State University aims to help identify and meet New Mexico’s health care delivery and technology development needs through a new grant from the U.S. Economic Development Administration.

NMSU’s economic development hub will receive $488,000 in grant funding to create a master development plan for Arrowhead Park that includes a health care technology cluster to better support startup companies focused on improving health care in the region and diversify the state’s economy.

The funding comes from the EDA’s Regional Innovation Strategies Program Science and Research Park Development Grant, which helps regions plan the creation or expansion of innovation centers. Arrowhead Park, a public-private land development partnership, offers space, facilities and services for technology-based businesses and connects entrepreneurs to researchers.

The health technology cluster plan will incorporate market analysis of the needs of this key sector in the region and guidelines for master-planned development of Arrowhead Park to meet identified demands.

“This award will have a significant impact on our work to create a sense of place for innovation in our region,” said Kathy Hansen, director of Arrowhead Center. “With this funding, we will be able to greatly expand our capacity to bring a single hub together with the talent and ventures that drive an innovation economy.”

The Science and Research Park Development Grants program provides funding for feasibility and planning for the construction of new or expanded science or research parks, or the renovation of existing facilities.

Wayne Savage, executive director of Arrowhead Park, said the grant will provide the foundation for much-needed job growth and workforce development in the health care and medical technology industry sectors.

“Our goal,” Savage said, “is to develop Arrowhead Park as an innovation community that catalyzes a more effective, efficient health care delivery model for New Mexico and the region, and improved health overall for our underserved populations.”

In announcing the grant award, U.S. Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Economic Development Jay Williams said supporting innovators and entrepreneurs at every stage is crucial to ensuring America remains competitive in the global economy.

“The Regional Innovation Strategies Program lays the groundwork from which centers of research and innovation can take root and thrive in cities across the country,” Willams said. “I look forward to seeing what innovative opportunities come from Regional Innovation Strategies’ funding.”

An agency within the U.S. Department of Commerce, the EDA makes investments in economically distressed communities in order to create jobs for U.S. workers, promote American innovation, and accelerate long-term sustainable economic growth.

Arrowhead Center has also received grants through the EDA’s University Center Economic Development Program, to identify gaps in the regional commercialization ecosystem and create programs that increase statewide participation in commercialization efforts, and the i6 Challenge, a national competition to spur innovation, accelerate commercialization of ideas to market, and create companies and jobs through support of proof of concept centers.

For more information about the Regional Innovation Strategies Program, including a full list of the 2014 grant recipients, please visit:

GOVERNOR SUSANA MARTINEZ ANNOUNCES NMSU’S ARROWHEAD CENTER TO RECEIVE COMPETITIVE GRANT TO FUND COLLABORATION BETWEEN RESEARCH AND SMALL BUSINESSES TAKING NEW TECHNOLOGIES TO MARKET

Santa Fe, NM – Today, Governor Susana Martinez announced that New Mexico State University was selected to receive a new $100,000 federal grant from the U.S. Small Business Assistance Federal and State Technology (FAST) Partnership Program. The grant, supported by the Martinez Administration, will help New Mexico State University’s entrepreneurship incubator, Arrowhead Center, build greater participation in two federal programs that fund collaborative efforts between researchers and small companies working to take new technologies to market.

“New Mexico higher education institutions, including NMSU, continue to demonstrate their ability to contribute to tech commercialization and getting products to market,” Governor Martinez said. “This was a highly competitive grant, and I am proud of the effort that went into securing this assistance to help our small businesses.”

Arrowhead Center was one of just 20 universities and organizations nationwide to receive the grant this year from the FAST Partnership Program. FAST improves participation of small businesses in federal Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer programs for innovative, technology-driven small businesses.

“The first step in creating a successful partnership is initial matchmaking,” said Kathy Hansen, Arrowhead Center’s director. “We’ll be hosting events with partners around the state to bring together researchers and entrepreneurs who can collaborate through SBIR/STTR activities.”

Arrowhead will also develop a comprehensive web-based presence for the program, Hansen said, and will provide participants with assistance in writing SBIR/STTR proposals, with input from NMSU faculty members who have served as reviewers of such proposals.

Paul Furth, an associate professor in electrical and computer engineering, serves as an Arrowhead Enterprise Advisor specializing in SBIR/STTR programming. He has helped spearhead efforts to apply for more awards, providing workshops and one-on-one mentoring to clients and will have a lead role in FAST programming.

“SBIR/STTRs are the federal government’s way to do angel investing in small U.S. businesses,” Furth said. “They’re great programs.”

The programs are administered by the SBA in collaboration with 11 federal agencies, which collectively supported more than $2.5 billion in federal research and development funding in fiscal year 2014. Companies supported by the SBIR and STTR programs often generate some of the most important breakthroughs each year in the U.S. For example, about 25 percent of R&D Magazine’s Top 100 Innovations come from SBIR-funded small businesses.

“FAST provides boots on the ground support at local levels to help entrepreneurs compete and win SBIR/STTR awards,” said John Williams, SBA’s Director of Innovation. “These programs are the largest source of non-diluted early stage funding in the world, attributing to the success of tens of thousands of firms since being established in 1982. Yet many entrepreneurs in cities and states across the country are unaware of the attributes, benefits and approaches to success in these programs, which are competitively awarded. The main goal of FAST is to increase that awareness through partnering organizations and level the playing field, especially in underrepresented areas.”

Candidates for the FAST proposals were submitted through each of their state and territorial governors, and each governor would submit only one proposal. After evaluations by panels of SBIR program managers, the SBA, the Department of Defense, and the National Science Foundation jointly reviewed panel recommendations and made FAST awards based upon the merits of each proposal. The FAST award project and budget periods are for 12 months, beginning Sept. 30, 2015.

“The FAST award will help Arrowhead fulfill one of the foundational elements of our mission: ensuring the resources of NMSU help people throughout New Mexico,” Hansen said. “By bringing assistance with SBIRs and STTRs to entrepreneurial thinkers and businesses who may not have been aware of these opportunities, we foresee great things for individual participants and for the state economy at-large.”

AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY AWARDS GRANT TO ARROWHEAD TO HELP STUDENT ENTREPRENEURS COMMERCIALIZE TECHNOLOGY

Date: June 12, 2015

by Vicki L. Nisbett

LAS CRUCES-The Air Force Research Laboratory has chosen New Mexico State University’s Arrowhead Center to pilot its Young Entrepreneur Program aimed at helping student entrepreneurs commercialize technology that is important to AFRL. AFRL has awarded Arrowhead a $50,000 grant to start the program. In addition, AFRL scientists and engineers will mentor the students as they ready their technology for commercial use.

Arrowhead has selected two students—Sasi Prabhakaran, a mechanical engineering doctoral student and Taylor Burgett, who is pursuing a master’s degree in electrical engineering—to take part in the pilot program. The two will work together to commercialize technology developed by Prabhakaran and Professor Dr. Amit Sanyal of the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department. The selected technology, an Adaptive Singularity-Free Control Moment Gyroscope, has the potential to be a cost-effective and power-saving solution to improve the precision movement of spacecraft.

“We are pleased to be able to provide New Mexico students greater opportunity to take technology and innovation being developed right here in our state and find a market for it,” Casey DeRaad, Director of AFRL New Mexico’s Technology Engagement Center said. “We are confident that our (YEP) will help create business and jobs here in New Mexico and give our best and brightest students incentive to stay here.”

Student entrepreneurs will also receive guidance and coaching from Arrowhead Center’s student incubator, Studio G.

“AFRL’s (YEP) is a tremendous opportunity for our students to work with a top-notch research lab,” Studio G Director Dr. Kramer Winingham said. “I’m excited to see what they will be able to accomplish. I believe we have all the pieces in place to succeed.”

More Details

The Air Force Research Laboratory Air Force Research Laboratory is the Air Force’s only organization wholly dedicated to leading the discovery, development and integration of warfighting technologies for our air, space and cyberspace. AFRL is comprised of nine directorates located across the country. AFRL New Mexico in Albuquerque is the proud home of two of those directorates: Directed Energy and Space Vehicles.

The YEP is funded and managed by AFRL New Mexico’s Technology Engagement Center. For more information visit

For more information about the Adaptive Singularity-Free Control Moment Gyroscope and Arrowhead’s Studio G, visit

NMSU’S ARROWHEAD CENTER RECEIVES GRANT TO BOOST SUPPORT OF SMALL BUSINESSES

Date: 06/15/2015

Writer: Amanda Bradford, 575-646-1996, ambradfo@nmsu.edu

A new $100,000 federal grant will help New Mexico State University’s entrepreneurship incubator, Arrowhead Center, build greater participation in two federal programs that fund collaborative efforts between researchers and small companies working to take new technologies to market.

Arrowhead Center was one of just 20 universities and organizations nationwide to receive the grant this year from the U.S. Small Business Assistance Federal and State Technology, or FAST, Partnership Program. FAST improves participation of small businesses in federal Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer programs for innovative, technology-driven small businesses.

“The first step in creating a successful partnership is initial matchmaking,” said Kathy Hansen, Arrowhead Center’s director. “We’ll be hosting events with partners around the state to bring together researchers and entrepreneurs who can collaborate through SBIR/STTR activities.”

The SBA, the Department of Defense and the National Science Foundation jointly reviewed the grant proposals, which were submitted through each of their state and territorial governors. Each governor was able to submit only one proposal.

“New Mexico higher education institutions, including NMSU, continue to demonstrate their ability to contribute to tech commercialization and getting products to market,” N.M. Gov. Susana Martinez said. “This was a highly competitive grant, and I am proud of the effort that went into securing this assistance to help our small businesses.”

Under the one-year grant, Arrowhead will also develop a comprehensive web-based presence for the program, Hansen said, and will provide participants with assistance in writing SBIR/STTR proposals, with input from NMSU faculty members who have served as reviewers of such proposals.

Paul Furth, an associate professor in electrical and computer engineering, serves as an Arrowhead Enterprise Advisor specializing in SBIR/STTR programming. He has helped spearhead efforts to apply for more awards, providing workshops and one-on-one mentoring to clients, and will have a lead role in FAST programming.

“SBIR/STTRs are the federal government’s way to do angel investing in small U.S. businesses,” Furth said. “They’re great programs.”

NMSU’S ARROWHEAD PARTNERS WITH MEXICAN INSTITUTIONS TO FOSTER ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Date: 06/18/2015

By Vicki L. Nisbett vnisbett@yahoo.com

LAS CRUCES >> A pioneering partnership that began last year between Arrowhead Center, Mexico City’s local government and several universities there is bringing innovative commercialization methods to participants.

Arrowhead Center, New Mexico State University’s economic development engine, was invited to help implement the unique, three-phase program, which is called “Atrevete a Emprender,” or “Dare to Be an Entrepreneur.”

The partnership included the Social Development Fund FONDESO, part of Mexico City’s local government, and five universities: Universidad Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Tecnologico Nacional de México and Universidad Autonoma de la Ciudad de Mexico.

Arrowhead served as the host for the first phase of the program, incorporating a business model program for participating teams composed of students, recent graduates, researchers and faculty members. To participate in the program, teams needed two to four participants with at least one student currently enrolled in one of the participating institutions.

In the second phase, Arrowhead will help participants improve business performance and will use hands-on training for staff members from each of the five institutions.

In the final phase of the program, Arrowhead will assist in creating seed funding for entrepreneurs in Mexico City to incentivize the creation of high-impact startups.

Business concepts were accepted regardless of the industry or stage of development from an early-stage idea to an operating startup wanting to grow. The number of applications indicated great interest from the target population to participate in this type of program.

“Being a high-impact and scalable business idea or existing startup is what we are looking for,” said Arrowhead Program Manager Griselda Martinez.

A public kickoff event to launch Atrevete a Emprender was held in Mexico City in March. Attendees included Kevin Boberg, NMSU’s vice president for economic development; Miguel Angel Mancera, Mexico City’s mayor; Enrique Jacob Rocha, federal undersecretary of small business for Mexico; presidents and representatives from the five participating universities; representatives of the U.S. Agency for International Development’s Mexico Economic Policy Program; and Arrowhead Center representatives.

“Atrevete a Emprender exemplifies mutually beneficial sustainable development,” Boberg said, “through innovation and entrepreneurship, founded in cultural respect and engagement.”

Arrowhead’s team will provide support remotely and on-site in Mexico City until its completion at the end of this year. The business model program is being delivered in Spanish, and all projects will be evaluated by Arrowhead Center’s staff, who will provide educational workshops and tools, guidance and coaching. All projects, whether or not they advance to the next stage in their participation of this program, will receive practical and constructive feedback throughout the process.

Martinez said finalists may have the chance to become a business incubator client at Arrowhead Center, providing them the opportunity to enter the U.S. and other international markets.

For more information, visit

Vicki L. Nisbett may be reached at 575-642-1334.

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